Bonding between Pump, Heater, Salt Generator Question

frank411

Member
Mar 14, 2016
16
GA
Hello,

I just recently had a heater installed and on the bonding lug my installer ran a green wire back inside the heater to the metal.

I could have sworn that they were supposed to run a wire from the bonding lug to join the other wire that is hooked to my pump, generator, and timer/thermostat. There is an existing bare copper wire ran from the ground through pump, to Salt generator, and back through my timer/thermostat.

The electrician of course doesnt know anything about bonding so its tough to know what to do or where to find someone. I even called the manufacturer and they wouldnt really tell me anything specific to help him.

Can someone look at these photos and tell me how theres was done to give me an idea?

I know for a fact when building the pool there was copper wire ran all the way arond the pool, the hand rails, ladder, and light niche so that part should be fine. Just wanted to make sure i am tying into this with the heater and being safe.
 
Last edited:

HeyEng

Silver Supporter
Nov 7, 2018
371
Oklahoma City, OK
Hello,

The electrician of course doesnt know anything about bonding so its tough to know what to do or where to find someone. I even called the manufacturer and they wouldnt really tell me anything specific to help him.
Is he an actual electrician? As in is he licensed as one or some handyman that doesn't know what he's talking about? I ask because I am almost 100% certain that a licensed electrician would be familiar with bonding.

Take a look here...it might help a little before the experts chime in.
 

frank411

Member
Mar 14, 2016
16
GA
Yeah he is owns a company and lots of good reviews. Hayward isnt much help with their vague instruction manual. It literally says sometihing like bond the pool to the grid but not how or with what type wire. It would help if they said exactly what to do with that lug on the outside the heat pump.

They are expecting the electrician to know I guess.
 

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
14,186
Bedford, TX
Frank,

I am not an electrician, and even I know that the bonding lugs are connected to the bare copper bond wire at your equipment pad and not to the ground of a unit..

Sigh!!

Jim R.
 
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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,339
That bonding lug doesn't look like it's connected at all?

Is there a different lug outside of the heater?

Notes to the electrician:
Use a solid copper conductor, size 8 or larger.

Run a continuous wire from external bonding lug to reinforcing rod or mesh. Connect a No. 8 AWG (8.4 mm2) solid copper bonding wire to the grounding lug provided on the heat pump and to all metal parts of swimming pool or spa, and to all electrical equipment, metal piping (except gas piping), and conduit within 5 ft. (1.5 m) of inside walls of swimming pool or spa.

IMPORTANT - Reference NEC codes for all wiring standards including, but not limited to, grounding, bonding and other general wiring procedures.

Wiring connections must be made as shown in the wiring diagram found on the inside of the heat pump access panel.

The heat pump must include a definite means of grounding and bonding.

There is a ground lug inside the heat pump electrical compartment and a bonding lug on the rear of the heat pump base pan.

Failure to properly make wiring terminations may result in personal injury.

CAUTION - This heat pump must be connected to a bonding grid with a solid copper conductor wire gauge 8 AWG or larger to comply with Article 680 of the NEC. All Hayward heat pumps are designed for copper conductors only.

The National Electrical Code (NEC) in Article 680, and most other codes require that all metallic components of a pool structure, including reinforcing steel, metal fittings and above ground equipment, be bonded together with a solid copper conductor wire gauge 8 AWG or larger.

The heat pump, along with pumps and other pool equipment must be connected to this bonding grid.

A bonding lug is provided on the rear of the base pan of the heat pump to facilitate bonding.
As noted in the installation instructions, there should be a bond lug on the exterior of the heater where you connect a #8 solid bare copper wire and the wire gets connected to the other bonding wires.
 
Last edited:

HeyEng

Silver Supporter
Nov 7, 2018
371
Oklahoma City, OK
That bonding lug doesn't look like it's connected at all?

Is there a different lug outside of the heater?



As noted in the installation instructions, there should be a bond lug on the exterior of the heater where you connect a #8 solid bare copper wire and the wire gets connected to the other bonding wires.
If anything, it looks like it *might* be attached to the PAINTED grid? And then it uses a insulated wire to the inside of the unit?!? I think that if an electrician did that to my equipment, there would be consideration given to contacting the folks who oversee the licencee...of course after giving him the chance to correct the installation TO CODE.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,339
It's not connected at all. You can see the empty hole where a screw is supposed to go to secure it.

There should be a factory bond lug on the outside of the heater. The lug in the picture is not the factory bond lug.
 

ipfhliyl

Bronze Supporter
Jun 10, 2011
14
North Central Ohio, USA
Article 680 of the National Electric Code specifies bonding requirements, including minimum #8 bare copper bonding conductor. Seems your “electrician” isn’t up to speed on the basic electrician’s Bible.
 

JohnT

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Apr 4, 2007
9,610
SW Indiana
Is he an actual electrician? As in is he licensed as one or some handyman that doesn't know what he's talking about? I ask because I am almost 100% certain that a licensed electrician would be familiar with bonding.

Take a look here...it might help a little before the experts chime in.
I’d be amazed to find an electrician who did understand bonding. I’m a retired electrical engineer, and I had to teach my electrician what was needed. He was open to learning and appreciative, but from all the mistakes posted on the forum it’s obvious most electricians have little understanding