Best Method to Aerate

jackrogue

LifeTime Supporter
Dec 8, 2012
33
Kailua-Kona, HI
sixn3is7 posted:
"During full sun, with mask and snorkel, I played with the angle of attack from straight down (-90 deg from horizontal) to nice arch (45deg from horizontal). Everywhere generated more/less bubbles but the interesting part was the amount of tiny Micro Bubbles (bubbles so small that they appear as a cloud or haze in the water). -45 deg provided the most Micro Bubbles such that the cloud of bubbles would almost make it to the other side. . . "

I'm still a newbie regarding pool hardware and water conditioning topics, so I've been reading many TFP posts:bowdown:

The most important thing that I have learned to date is that I should only attempt to solve one problem at a time, especially chemical problems. I'm still working diligently on perfecting my testing/balancing techniques. Aeration became interesting, since my pool had largely been idle for YEARS --- I bought a former vacation rental property. My TA ranged 210-330 PPM from 1/1/13 to 12/4/13, a period when pool maintenance was not one of my priorities ---- we just weren't using the pool.

I made pool maintenance a priority :testkit: at the beginning of 2014 and started down my list. When aeration became my next "to do", I started experimenting with PVC pipe/fittings to add aeration to our pool:
1- "nice arch (45deg from horizontal)" has won for now
2- "-45 deg provided the most Micro Bubbles such that the cloud of bubbles would almost make it to the other side" is my next build
Everything I've read states that micro bubbles are most important for aeration, so back to the workbench I go :hammer:

Assessment will follow . . . .
 

jackrogue

LifeTime Supporter
Dec 8, 2012
33
Kailua-Kona, HI

"I made pool maintenance a priority :testkit: at the beginning of 2014 and started down my list. When aeration became my next "to do", I started experimenting with PVC pipe/fittings to add aeration to our pool:
1- "nice arch (45deg from horizontal)" has won for now
2- "-45 deg provided the most Micro Bubbles such that the cloud of bubbles would almost make it to the other side" is my next build
Everything I've read states that micro bubbles are most important for aeration, so back to the workbench I go :hammer:

Assessment will follow . . . .


This just out:

Yup ---- micro bubbles are the way to go ---- multiple 1/8" diameter jets oriented -45 degrees to the horizontal worked the best:

pool aerator micro bubbles.jpg

. . . other views:

pool aerator1.jpg

pool aerator2.jpg

pool aerator3.jpg

I also added Infusion Venturi return line fittings to the three remaining returns to improve water circulation.

MO BETTA, brah! :party:
 

steveg_nh

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Oct 7, 2013
832
Southern NH
How did you connect to the polaris line? Did you unscrew the quick release fitting or buy another insert and connect your PVC to that? Or if you use a regular return I assume you guys are unscrewing the eyeball and screwing in the homemade aerator? I read about some threads in pool school regarding this. Something I need to make.
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,083
San Rafael, CA USA
Very nice aeration. If you notice that the TA drops more quickly given the same pH lowering, basically that you are adding more acid or adding it more frequently so that the process seems to be sped up, that would be good to know.
 

jackrogue

LifeTime Supporter
Dec 8, 2012
33
Kailua-Kona, HI
How did you connect to the polaris line? Did you unscrew the quick release fitting or buy another insert and connect your PVC to that? Or if you use a regular return I assume you guys are unscrewing the eyeball and screwing in the homemade aerator? I read about some threads in pool school regarding this. Something I need to make.
Polaris line? No comprendo :confused: . . . my four pool returns were 1-1/2" ID PVC pipes which were terminated without any fittings --- they protruded about 1/4" from the pool wall --- no eyeballs were in my pool. I ordered four A1972 Infusion Venturi Return Line Fittings --- mine are "knock-in" type, which fit snugly inside the 1-1/2" pipe. Three variations are available, depending upon your returns configuration.

I used the "tight bend" 90-degree part of a 1-1/2 in. Plastic P-Trap with Reversible J-Bend kit (see below graphic) so I could position my aerator as close to the pool wall as possible and level with the pool deck. After lots of "bin diving" at hardware stores, that's the best fit that I could find, using off-the-shelf pieces/parts.

aerator piping.jpg
 

steveg_nh

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Oct 7, 2013
832
Southern NH
Polaris line? No comprendo :confused: . . . my four pool returns were 1-1/2" ID PVC pipes which were terminated without any fittings --- they protruded about 1/4" from the pool wall --- no eyeballs were in my pool. I ordered four A1972 Infusion Venturi Return Line Fittings --- mine are "knock-in" type, which fit snugly inside the 1-1/2" pipe. Three variations are available, depending upon your returns configuration.

I used the "tight bend" 90-degree part of a 1-1/2 in. Plastic P-Trap with Reversible J-Bend kit (see below graphic) so I could position my aerator as close to the pool wall as possible and level with the pool deck. After lots of "bin diving" at hardware stores, that's the best fit that I could find, using off-the-shelf pieces/parts.

View attachment 29148
Ah. I get it now. Thanks!
 

jackrogue

LifeTime Supporter
Dec 8, 2012
33
Kailua-Kona, HI
Ah. I get it now. Thanks!
You get the picture (no pun intended)!

I do need to make a pipe size correction to my previous post. I did NOT use the "tight bend" 90-degree part of a 1-1/2 in. Plastic P-Trap with Reversible J-Bend kit ---- I used the "tight bend" 90-degree part of a 1-1/4 in. Plastic P-Trap.

I used 1 inch ID (Inside Diameter) PVC pipe and fittings for my aerator, since the OD (Outside Diameter) of the 1-1/4 inch "tight bend" 90-degree part closely approximates the OD of 1" ID PVC pipe --- since the pipe wall thicknesses are different.

Rube Goldberg would be proud. :salut:

- - - Updated - - -

Some innovative ideas here!

Luckily I just twist the knob on my swimjet aerator !

Wow --- that's what we get with new technology!
 

jackrogue

LifeTime Supporter
Dec 8, 2012
33
Kailua-Kona, HI
If you notice that the TA drops more quickly given the same pH lowering, basically that you are adding more acid or adding it more frequently so that the process seems to be sped up, that would be good to know.
Agreed . . . . I'll be monitoring TA closer to better judge the effect of consistent aeration.
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,083
San Rafael, CA USA
The Down and Churn are similar in that they create lots of tiny bubbles which is what you want to do and are generally more effective than spraying up (which is usually used to cool the water via evaporation). The idea is to maximize surface area between the air and water boundary. One also needs to have pool circulation on so that the depleted TA near the surface gets replenished by TA elsewhere in the pool and also so that the pH stays lower (remember that a lower pH is a critical part of the process since it speeds up the rate of carbon dioxide outgassing).

Another approach not seen in your list is a literal aerator where one uses air pumped in to create tiny bubbles similar to aerators used in fish tanks (but bigger) as shown here or here (scroll down to "AquaMaster AquaAir 6- Six Diffuser Sub-Surface Aeration System for Large Lakes") or here. These aerators/diffusers not only maximize oxygen getting into the pool but likewise maximize carbon dioxide leaving the pool. Basically the air bubbles (that are mostly nitrogen gas) have carbon dioxide enter into them and then leave the pool at the surface. A lower pool pH helps here as well since it increases the rate of carbon dioxide diffusion into the bubbles.
 

peacefulkancer

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Aug 5, 2013
179
Chandler, AZ
The Down and Churn are similar in that they create lots of tiny bubbles which is what you want to do and are generally more effective than spraying up (which is usually used to cool the water via evaporation). The idea is to maximize surface area between the air and water boundary. One also needs to have pool circulation on so that the depleted TA near the surface gets replenished by TA elsewhere in the pool and also so that the pH stays lower (remember that a lower pH is a critical part of the process since it speeds up the rate of carbon dioxide outgassing).

Another approach not seen in your list is a literal aerator where one uses air pumped in to create tiny bubbles similar to aerators used in fish tanks (but bigger) as shown here or here (scroll down to "AquaMaster AquaAir 6- Six Diffuser Sub-Surface Aeration System for Large Lakes") or here. These aerators/diffusers not only maximize oxygen getting into the pool but likewise maximize carbon dioxide leaving the pool. Basically the air bubbles (that are mostly nitrogen gas) have carbon dioxide enter into them and then leave the pool at the surface. A lower pool pH helps here as well since it increases the rate of carbon dioxide diffusion into the bubbles.
Interesting on the underwater aerator items you listed. Has anyone here done anything like that DIY?

And with that said I feel like I would be better off converting one of my return jets (or my above-ground side return fan-jet things) to something that churns water than tosses it into the air or my waterfall. Maybe, at least... for the simple fact that the waterfall is o a separate pump and if I am doing the waterfall then it is pump+pump=$$$ versus pump=$.

At this moment I have the return fan-jet pointed at the water instead of up in the air.
 

peacefulkancer

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Aug 5, 2013
179
Chandler, AZ

Staudie

Member
Sep 24, 2013
9
Santa Rosa, CA
Polaris line? No comprendo :confused: . . . my four pool returns were 1-1/2" ID PVC pipes which were terminated without any fittings --- they protruded about 1/4" from the pool wall --- no eyeballs were in my pool. I ordered four A1972 Infusion Venturi Return Line Fittings --- mine are "knock-in" type, which fit snugly inside the 1-1/2" pipe. Three variations are available, depending upon your returns configuration.

I used the "tight bend" 90-degree part of a 1-1/2 in. Plastic P-Trap with Reversible J-Bend kit (see below graphic) so I could position my aerator as close to the pool wall as possible and level with the pool deck. After lots of "bin diving" at hardware stores, that's the best fit that I could find, using off-the-shelf pieces/parts.

View attachment 29148
Just wanted to say thanks to Jackrouge for his idea... I made two of these (one for each return) to help drive down my TAIMG_20150728_183232889 - 1.jpg
 

Rangeball

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
785
I could never get aeration to work to get my TA down prior to PH rising and requiring more acid.

What I do now when it's needed is add the acid ahead of rain. Rain is the supreme aerator. And it's free :)