Baquacil Conversion

ghall6292

Active member
Jun 10, 2018
38
North Central PA
Finally looks like we will have a full week without snow and nighttime temps in the mid 20's. Didn't want to start my conversion until I was fairly certain I wouldn't have frozen equipment, etc. to deal with. To update, I have deep cleaned my filter, replaced the seal and o-ring inside my pump with high-quality aftermarkets, re-taped all threads on my PVC fittings, and drained and refilled about 1/3 of my water with spring rains (and snow melt!) I have secured all my Chlorine and other chemicals to get underway. My Baquacil strips now show no residual oxidizer, and only a slight amount of sanitizer remaining. My water temp is now up to 55 degrees. I think I'm ready to go! Readings today using my new TF-100 kit, at 1:30 p.m.: PH 7.4, CH 250, TA 90, and of course, no Chlorine or Combined Chlorine. CYA is also 0, to be added once we are near the finish line.

Should I try to clean the solar cover and winter cover to remove the Baquacil residue (and with what?) or just consider replacing them and starting over? Neither is new. Also, in looking under the winter cover with a light, I can see what appears to be dead algae on the bottom. I know we had an algae bloom late in the season, and I pounded it with three gallons of oxidizer prior to closing. I'm planning on vacuuming that to waste prior to starting. Otherwise, the floor looks quite clean, the sides don't feel slippery, and the water is very clear. I believe I have read "How To Convert Your Bacqua Pool To Chlorine" at least a dozen times! Did I miss anything?
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
16,607
Tucson, AZ
Go ahead but be sure to lower your pH first to 7.0/7.2 range. The bleach is going to add a lot of excess lye to the water which will raise pH. When oxidizing contaminants with bleach, you really want the pH to be lower as that will maximize the amount of hypochlorous acid in the water and offset the initial pH rise when the bleach is added.
 

Leebo

Admin
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 21, 2011
9,524
Eastern Ohio
Yep, you forgot a photo after you’ve dumped in loads of chlorine 😉

Towards the middle of the conversion you can take the covers and toss them in for a large “chlorine bath” or if you’ve got room lay them in the yard and wash them down with a mixture of bleach and water. Neither are a major worry however as little baqua is likely on either of them.
 
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ghall6292

Active member
Jun 10, 2018
38
North Central PA
Finally got this conversion underway early yesterday morning. Took a few pic's that accidentally got deleted :confused:, but I had no drastic color show; just a change from clear deep blue to pea soup over the course of a couple hours. Skimmed off some of the scum manually around 6:00 last night. Took most of the day to get my FC to hold at 11 by midnight last night. This morning, FC was @10 at 6 am. Added the amount of chlorine to bring it to 15, then brushed my pool. Stirred up a lot of cloudy green water and it also dropped my FC back to 6. I was wondering if I should try to vacuum some of the water to waste to lighten some of the chlorine demand, or just wait for my readings to hold closer to the desired 15? My readings right now are: FC 11, TA 100, CH 250, CYA 0, and PH 7.4.

Thanks
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
16,607
Tucson, AZ
The more solids you can get out of the water the better. If you can vacuum slowly to waste without stirring up big clouds of debris, that would help a lot.