Automated Liquid Chlorination system

GDN

Bronze Supporter
Oct 17, 2016
373
Dallas, TX
Sure - glad to help. All I know, I've learned from this site and @bdavis466 and @Jimrahbe were both helpful several years ago with how the Easytouch works and diagrams. This thread is likely one that I used a few years ago - Stenner wiring However I understand your initial hesitation, I was afraid of messing something up. Once you understand the flow of electricity through the Easy Touch and relays, it is pretty easy to conquer. I'm will search for a couple of pictures I know I have and another post with more details to help out. It's really pretty straight forward.
 

colonelkirby

Silver Supporter
Mar 20, 2017
34
DFW - Plano, TX
As to the feed tube from the Stenner to the injection point, I use a length 3/4 flexible conduit to encase the feed tubing. The injection point is just the right size to fit snugly in the 3/4 conduit. Keeps the sun out...
 
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GDN

Bronze Supporter
Oct 17, 2016
373
Dallas, TX
I found this drawing, it is from @bdavis466 - it shows the wiring from one relay to another and then wiring to the Stenner. Note this if for a 220 Stenner. It has two hots. If your pump is 110 then you only need one of the hots.

What I did with these was not to directly wire the Stenner pump. I took these outside the Easytouch to a 220 outlet and then plugged the Pump in to the outlet. Then just turn the outlet on and off from the relay (programmed to run automatically every day for a set time from the Screen logic software) when I want to pump chlorine.

stenner wiring.jpg
 
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thephatp

Well-known member
Jul 8, 2018
81
Austin, TX
I found this drawing, it is from @bdavis466 - it shows the wiring from one relay to another and then wiring to the Stenner.

View attachment 139390
This is PERFECT! Thank you so much! I figured (was hoping) it would be simple, but this makes it very clear.

The specs sheet on the Stenner pumps doesn't say how much amperage it draws. I'm assuming very little, but have you had any problems having the Stenner on the same breaker as your pump?

Did you kill the power to your EasyTouch before doing this? If so, did it lose all of the programming?

Note this if for a 220 Stenner. It has two hots. If your pump is 110 then you only need one of the hots.
I'm sure I would have had that question, so thanks for preemptively answering. :)

What I did with these was not to directly wire the Stenner pump. I took these outside the Easytouch to a 220 outlet and then plugged the Pump in to the outlet. Then just turn the outlet on and off from the relay (programmed to run automatically every day for a set time from the Screen logic software) when I want to pump chlorine.
I was also thinking about wiring up to an outlet as well for more flexibility/ease of replacement if needed later.
 
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jonpcar

Bronze Supporter
Jun 1, 2016
483
Gilbert, AZ
In pics of Stenner pumps I've seen, the tubes look clear (for example, here on Amazon), which isn't good. Did you guys buy different tubing to use with your pumps? Also, I've seen some pumps come with only 1 tube (at least that's what it shows in pics). Did you have to buy extra? And I'm assuming you just used the 1/4", correct?

@jonpcar - What material did you use to build the covering over your equipment? I really like that idea!
Stenner pump kits come in a variety of different configurations both on Amazon and other sites...here is an example of the model you highlighted with options to select color/size of tubing:


You want the UV resistant black tubing if it is going to be in the sun (or you need to encase it as @colonelkirby showed...I did the encasing in addition to having the black tubing). Disadvantage is that you cant see inside it. You can buy all the stenner parts separately including tubing...I've bought a number of items from an authorized dealer on EBay, including a 50-foot roll of tubing.

Here is the thread where I describe my pool equipment shade:

 
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GDN

Bronze Supporter
Oct 17, 2016
373
Dallas, TX
Wiring to an outlet just makes it really easy if there are problems down the road or when you want to remove the Stenner to put new tubing in each year or two (you will have some maintenance to keep it running good). There was also talk a few years ago that if you cut the plug off the Stenner to direct wire it, that would void the warranty, so this just made it very convenient.

I've never had any problems with Amperage or power at the pump. It was noted in my documentation thread, that my electrician didn't do the best job of wiring. I assume I am to code, but they put no breakers in my ET8. They have a run from my main panel in the garage out to the pool. The main panel had a 240 and a 120 breaker added. Those are run to the 2 switches in this picture. The switches are the ones with lift covers. One of them will shut off the 110 and the other will shut off the 240 at the pad. The 120 is simply for the outlet above on the wall and the pad light. The 220 runs everything else. The pool lights are only 120, but they also get their power out of the ET8 from just a single leg of the 220 if I recall.

Bottom line, story on the wiring is that all I need to do when working on the panel or most anything out there is to shut the power off at the two switches out on the wall. That cuts the power to the panel and pump. The ET8 does not lose its setup when that happens, those settings are stored in some sort of safe RAM that survives a power outage.
 
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Farmerstan91

Well-known member
Jun 28, 2019
56
Sw missouri
A simpler option would be a venturi to pull from the bulk tank instead of pumping. Run it with a timer to control how long the valves are open to draw from the tank. Venturi goes in the same spot a swg would so it doesnt touch the pump or the filter and goes straight out the returns. 90% of farmers use a manual venturi for chems so only clean water touches the pump1C483205-B7A3-4C70-97F6-112E35126DED.png
 

jonpcar

Bronze Supporter
Jun 1, 2016
483
Gilbert, AZ
Perfect! For the Banjo Venturi model you posted (49 gpm), I should be able to inject my pool’s peak summer daily chlorine needs in about .4 seconds, in the winter of course it would be much faster...maybe about .05 seconds. Now, just to find that quick valve I need to control it. ;)
 

yangcha1

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 8, 2015
103
Central Maryland
All,

I have this idea to automate pumping liquid chlorine into my pool with a Arduino driven set up. This has probably been done before but I am looking for comments particularly related to safety and if this is a bad Idea for some reason I might not realize.

The Arduino would command the driver to open a 12v DC power circuit to the pump for enough seconds to move 1/2 gal of 12.5% CL every night at 3am while the filter pump is on. I would test water about twice a week and fill the CL tank on weekends.

It is all 12V DC power but I am wondering if I should think about Any special grounding of the tank even though AC arcing through the driver board is unlikely. The pump would get it's power from the Driver, and not its own connection. The driver itself gets power from a 12V 30A supply.

Also, I looking to only store a about a weeks worth of 12.5% CL and am wondering about degradation of chlorine over time do to heat as it will be fairly exposed to heat in the Arizona Sun. Though UV light will be blocked using a black plastic tank.

Thanks in advance for your comments.

View attachment 128994
Why not convert to salt water pool? Much more reliably and convenient for automation.
 

Farmerstan91

Well-known member
Jun 28, 2019
56
Sw missouri
Perfect! For the Banjo Venturi model you posted (49 gpm), I should be able to inject my pool’s peak summer daily chlorine needs in about .4 seconds, in the winter of course it would be much faster...maybe about .05 seconds. Now, just to find that quick valve I need to control it. ;)
49 gpm would be the through flow. My 3” setup pulls 10-15 gpm. They make smaller ones was just showing a full setup
 

thephatp

Well-known member
Jul 8, 2018
81
Austin, TX
Why not convert to salt water pool? Much more reliably and convenient for automation.
I've got a ton of stone all around my pool, and I don't want to have to seal it every 6 months. I also don't want the look of it being sealed all the time. I like seeing a dark contrast when it's wet, and light when it's dry. I have a friend a couple miles away that put int a pool after me, and he did SWG. I'm jealous, but I wouldn't do it differently if I could do it again--I love the look of my stone. :) Also, I can have the same effect by installing this automatic liquid chlorinator. :p
 

Katodude

Silver Supporter
Aug 22, 2017
738
West Palm Beach/Florida
Are you worried about the salt on your stone? There is a lot of discussion around that here on this forum. The amount of salt in a salt water pool is 1/10 that of the ocean. Your pool probably already has a bunch of residual salt from LC and other chemicals that you add.
 

yangcha1

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 8, 2015
103
Central Maryland
Are you worried about the salt on your stone? There is a lot of discussion around that here on this forum. The amount of salt in a salt water pool is 1/10 that of the ocean. Your pool probably already has a bunch of residual salt from LC and other chemicals that you add.
From my experience, I never see any salt residual issue from my salt water pool.
 

spoonman

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2016
401
Peoria, AZ
The buried tanks look like a good idea. I am in Arizona and had to abandon using a Stenner for NaCl due to degradation issues as well as continuing fluctuations in demand. I converted my Stenner to MA and have found it MUCH easier to “automate” than liquid chlorine. With chlorine injection I found I was always behind the amount needed due to degradation, pool use, hot days, organics, etc. I’m interested to hear if your experience in Arizona is different, particularly if you bury the tank.
 

jonpcar

Bronze Supporter
Jun 1, 2016
483
Gilbert, AZ
The buried tanks look like a good idea. I am in Arizona and had to abandon using a Stenner for NaCl due to degradation issues as well as continuing fluctuations in demand. I converted my Stenner to MA and have found it MUCH easier to “automate” than liquid chlorine. With chlorine injection I found I was always behind the amount needed due to degradation, pool use, hot days, organics, etc. I’m interested to hear if your experience in Arizona is different, particularly if you bury the tank.
Hey spoonman...I have one of the buried tanks...but I don’t yet know how well my chlorine Stenner system will work (long term) as I haven’t been religious about keeping records, etc...until now. Previously I have been dosing daily (probably overdosing), but I haven’t had issues like you describe. My chlorine dosing has simply been set to a daily “timed” value, injected once a day. My pool probably doesn’t get as much use and it also doesn’t get a lot of debris, so circumstances could be different.

So what are you doing for chlorine now? Hand dosing, or did you go to a SWG?
 

thephatp

Well-known member
Jul 8, 2018
81
Austin, TX
@jonpcar, @GDN, @RonsPlc (and anyone else using a tank outside), does the tank require a breather hole of some kind?

If all of the barrel plugs are sealed, but the pump is trying to suck water out, does it need to replace that space with air, or risk burning up the pump? I have two plugs in my barrel, and I have them both sealed off (smaller one with a rubber plug that I bore a 1/4" hole in and fed the pump tube through, and the other is the larger 2" hole where I pour in the chlorine. Both are sealed off right now.

I sealed them, because I don't anything getting into the barrel, obviously, but now I'm wondering if I need to figure out another way to allow air, but still protect from water/debris/etc.
 

GDN

Bronze Supporter
Oct 17, 2016
373
Dallas, TX
I just drilled a hole in to the lid for my suction tube to pass through. That hole is a little loose and I did not seal it, so air can pass through.