Anionic pool chemicals

Aqua Lab Rat

In The Industry
May 1, 2015
120
Anoka, MN
I have a need for either clarifier or flocc that is anionic (for some experiments I can't talk about). I'm assuming that some of the "metal out" products are anionic but not sure if any work as clarifiers or floccs. Simply deactivating or sequestering isn't enough, I need to be able to filter out the result. Does anyone know if there is such a thing readily available?
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
16,955
Tucson, AZ
More information is needed about what you are trying to do or achieve. The terms “anionic” and “cationic” are very general and simply refer to the state of a molecules charge when dissolved in water. Compounds can have simple charges, positive (cationic) or negative (anionic) on them, they can be polyionic (multiple positive or negative charges) or even zwitterionic (where the postive and negative charges are spatially separated leading to a strong dipole).
 

bdavis466

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
Aug 4, 2014
5,489
San Clemente, CA
My guess is it's for a calcium reducer but being that you're from Minnesota makes me question that theory... but I question myself frequently and rarely like the answer.

Can't wait to find out what you're brewing!
 

Aqua Lab Rat

In The Industry
May 1, 2015
120
Anoka, MN
I wish I could go into detail but there are nondisclosure agreements and corporate secrets & such. It isn't for calcium. I need something that works like commonly available pool clarifiers do, but with the opposite charge. And I can't travel to an anti-matter universe to get it.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
16,955
Tucson, AZ
Poly aluminum chloride is cationic (the Al3+ provides the positively charged ions for flocculating suspended solids). Most non-toxic anionic water soluble compounds for treatment are going to be singly charged surfactants akin to soaps. You can look into using polyanionic cellulose (PAC) sold under multiple different trade names; I believe DuPont offers free samples. Another option would be sodium lignosulfolnate as a polyanion. You could look at ion exchange resins as well. If you call DuPont or 3M, they have technical specialists that can offer advice on their products.

Good luck, try not to poison yourself or others in the process☠