A plumber, I am not. Where to cut?

Household6

LifeTime Supporter
Sep 15, 2013
437
Fayetteville, NC
It’s been over 10 years since our sand has been replaced (bought in 2009 and we have never replaced it.)
Picked up 300 lbs of silica sand from Leslie’s. Opened up the filter to allow the water to drain and I’m betting no more than 2 cups had drained in the last two hours since I’ve been fiddling with trying to get the head/control valve off. What did drain was milky white. It’s time.

Got the ring off the head and it will shimmy just a tad, but I obviously need to cut some pipes to remove it. My question is WHERE?

Is this a case of where I’d be better off to make a run to Lowe’s and replace it all? If so, anything I need to know? (Type of PVC, glue, rings to get (or not get)?)
This stuff isn’t crazy expensive, is it?
 

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Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
PVC parts are not really expensive. The most expensive parts (and not really high) are unions that you may want to try and install this time. I see one such union but it appears to be on the waste line after that ball valve with the black handle. The other two lines (in & out) will need to be cut and re-done. Now is the time for you to jot-down on paper how you would like the plumbing to flow and consider the amount of elbows, unions, etc you may need. Of course don't forget the PVC glue. But you can do it. If you have other specific question post back here and others will help.
 

Household6

LifeTime Supporter
Sep 15, 2013
437
Fayetteville, NC
PVC parts are not really expensive. The most expensive parts (and not really high) are unions that you may want to try and install this time. I see one such union but it appears to be on the waste line after that ball valve with the black handle. The other two lines (in & out) will need to be cut and re-done. Now is the time for you to jot-down on paper how you would like the plumbing to flow and consider the amount of elbows, unions, etc you may need. Of course don't forget the PVC glue. But you can do it. If you have other specific question post back here and others will help.
“how I would like the plumbing to flow”?
Is there any reason I might want to change such?

I’m gathering this is 1.5”, right?

Is there any particular type of PVC I need to get? (I’m guessing some is thicker than others?)

Thanks for the glue reminder! Forgetting such seems about like something I’d do.
 

Rancho Cost-a-Lotta

Silver Supporter
Apr 10, 2018
803
Rancho Cucamonga, CA
Use only SCH 40 PVC (Stay away from Drain Waste Vent DWV PVC). You can use a miter box and saw to make straight cuts. Pick up some PVC primer along with your glue. Test fit all parts using soapy water. It makes it easier to slide the joints together and take them apart. PVC is cheap. Buy double the parts you think you'll need. Worst case scenario, you'll use 'em all. Best case scenario, you'll have some extra parts for repairs. Your current plumbing should be marked with the diameter...it looks like 1 1/2".

Good luck!
 
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Household6

LifeTime Supporter
Sep 15, 2013
437
Fayetteville, NC
Use only SCH 40 PVC (Stay away from Drain Waste Vent DWV PVC). You can use a miter box and saw to make straight cuts. Pick up some PVC primer along with your glue. Test fit all parts using soapy water. It makes it easier to slide the joints together and take them apart. PVC is cheap. Buy double the parts you think you'll need. Worst case scenario, you'll use 'em all. Best case scenario, you'll have some extra parts for repairs. Your current plumbing should be marked with the diameter...it looks like 1 1/2".

Good luck!
Any reason I would want to run the plumbing a different way?

The rest - Exactly what I needed to know. Thanks!
 

markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
428
Marrietta Ga
Use only SCH 40 PVC (Stay away from Drain Waste Vent DWV PVC). You can use a miter box and saw to make straight cuts. Pick up some PVC primer along with your glue. Test fit all parts using soapy water. It makes it easier to slide the joints together and take them apart. PVC is cheap. Buy double the parts you think you'll need. Worst case scenario, you'll use 'em all. Best case scenario, you'll have some extra parts for repairs. Your current plumbing should be marked with the diameter...it looks like 1 1/2".

Good luck!
I always forget parts ;) luckily HomeDepot is only 4 miles away.
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
3,356
Damascus, MD
In my opinion, you are going to need to re-plumb most of that. The reason is that the fittings that screw into your multiport will most likely not go back in the same position that they are now. I would re-plumb it all and once you come out of your multiport, put a union right there. That allows future removal without cutting again.

See below pic where I put those grey unions just after the threaded connection into the multiport.

20190430_162031.jpg
 
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Household6

LifeTime Supporter
Sep 15, 2013
437
Fayetteville, NC
Thanks all for your input and advice!
That was a royal PITA, but really only due to the record highs we’ve had the last few days.

When I initially started the pump back up I had several leaks, the worst of which was around both sides of the collar that go around the top of the filter - both a steady stream. But it was good enough for the day to be able to get things back up and running and start rescuing the water.

Seems odd to me, but some of the leaks, including those around the collar, slowed way down when I checked it a couple hours later.

I realize the leaks with a threaded connection can be remedied with a bit more Teflon tape, prob can get a gasket for the collar, viewing glass needs a new gasket, but is there something I can easily do about the glue/cement connections? I reeeeally don’t want to redo these connections.

Bad idea to try and apply some add’l glue/cement around the outer edges of these connections? Can I use some caulk (what kind?)?
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
3,356
Damascus, MD
Thanks all for your input and advice!
That was a royal PITA, but really only due to the record highs we’ve had the last few days.

When I initially started the pump back up I had several leaks, the worst of which was around both sides of the collar that go around the top of the filter - both a steady stream. But it was good enough for the day to be able to get things back up and running and start rescuing the water.

Seems odd to me, but some of the leaks, including those around the collar, slowed way down when I checked it a couple hours later.

I realize the leaks with a threaded connection can be remedied with a bit more Teflon tape, prob can get a gasket for the collar, viewing glass needs a new gasket, but is there something I can easily do about the glue/cement connections? I reeeeally don’t want to redo these connections.

Bad idea to try and apply some add’l glue/cement around the outer edges of these connections? Can I use some caulk (what kind?)?
Yes, you can slather PVC glue around the leaking slip connections. It works to seal small leaks. I have done it several times and the fix it permanent. Make sure they are as dry as they can get and I would wait at least 30 minutes after slathering to turn the pump back on.

Also teflon tape is not the best thing to use for PVC connections, thread sealant is much better.
 
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PoolguyinCT

In The Industry
Jul 21, 2014
3,084
Connecticut
In my opinion, you are going to need to re-plumb most of that. The reason is that the fittings that screw into your multiport will most likely not go back in the same position that they are now. I would re-plumb it all and once you come out of your multiport, put a union right there. That allows future removal without cutting again.

See below pic where I put those grey unions just after the threaded connection into the multiport.

View attachment 103005
Nice work buddy;
but next time stagger them, makes the channel locks spin faster... you have about 15 yrs to plan for it though