A couple of odd ground changes. Will this majorly affect my pool later down the road?

Poolsnotmygame

Active member
Apr 25, 2019
34
Massapequa, NY
In the one photo, I’m trying to show how the ground downgrades to the right. Pay attention to the fence, the ground and pavers follow that slope, along with the skimmer that’s way below water level and the other skimmer just barely.

Second photo, I have a crater in the side wall and the liner sunk into it.

Are any of these issues something I should seriously worry about? This is my second pool season since moving into this house. I’m a pool novice. Thanks guys.
 

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Poolsnotmygame

Active member
Apr 25, 2019
34
Massapequa, NY
Was the slope in the pool there when you bought the house?

I doubt the pool was built with that slope.
Yea it was there when I bought the home. Couldn’t tell much at the time since it was covered when I moved in. I thought nothing of it either until my neighbor asked if that “problem” is still there because (old homeowner) was freaking out about it. And I said to myself, huh oh.
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
3,832
Damascus, MD
Yea it was there when I bought the home. Couldn’t tell much at the time since it was covered when I moved in. I thought nothing of it either until my neighbor asked if that “problem” is still there because (old homeowner) was freaking out about it. And I said to myself, huh oh.
Was it disclosed?
 
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ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
10,798
Northern NJ
You know anything about what the construction of the pool is? What the pool walls are made of?

You have any idea how old the pool is? It would help to figure out the history of the pool and when and how that slope occurred.

If it has been that way for 20 years then you may be good for another 20.

It looks like the white fence was installed following the slope.

@jimmythegreek may have ideas.
 

Poolsnotmygame

Active member
Apr 25, 2019
34
Massapequa, NY
I’ve been through some of the things the old homeowners kept which is largely pool stuff, but I fear nothing about how it was built. I found out from the neighbor the pool is roughly 15 years old give or take. I think that the slope is fairly new since the last homeowners were here for 7 years in total and my neighbor mentioned that he was upset about it. That’s the best time frame I have I’m afraid. I do know there used to be a spa as well, however there no longer is, and I haven’t been able to figure out where it was. Perhaps it was that corner?
 

borjis

LifeTime Supporter
Aug 19, 2014
3,011
Pacific NW
wow, is it only sloped really bad in the corner? looks like the water line is less sloped as it gets closer to the camera (far right in the image at the coping line).

I can tell you this is nowhere near as bad as it could be. There was one post a few years back where the ground had settled down quite a bit, like 1 or 2 feet
and it ended up being determined that a full demolition and reconstruction was their only option.


Funny about the spa, at one point the previous owners of my home had an external one because the breaker box shows one breaker for "Hot Tub"
and I'll be darned if I cannot find the outlet anywhere. The breaker for it has been off since I can remember and every outlet inside and outside works.
 

Poolsnotmygame

Active member
Apr 25, 2019
34
Massapequa, NY
You know anything about what the construction of the pool is? What the pool walls are made of?

You have any idea how old the pool is? It would help to figure out the history of the pool and when and how that slope occurred.

If it has been that way for 20 years then you may be good for another 20.

It looks like the white fence was installed following the slope.

@jimmythegreek may have ideas.
I’ve been through some of the things the old homeowners kept which is largely pool stuff, but I fear nothing about how it was built. I found out from the neighbor the pool is roughly 15 years old give or take. I think that the slope is fairly new since the last homeowners were here for 7 years in total and my neighbor mentioned that he was upset about it. That’s the best time frame I have I’m afraid. I do know there used to be a spa as well, however there no longer is, and I haven’t been able to figure out where it was. Perhaps it was that corner?
 

Poolsnotmygame

Active member
Apr 25, 2019
34
Massapequa, NY
wow, is it only sloped really bad in the corner? looks like the water line is less sloped as it gets closer to the camera (far right in the image at the coping line).

I can tell you this is nowhere near as bad as it could be. There was one post a few years back where the ground had settled down quite a bit, like 1 or 2 feet
and it ended up being determined that a full demolition and reconstruction was their only option.
Yes it’s only that corner. It really only seems to be the ground. I’ve had pool guys come and go without so much as mentioning it. So I’m really not sure how bad it is? Aside from that 1-2ft and demolition? 😱
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
10,798
Northern NJ
Check with the town or whoever issues building permits for you and see what records they have of the pool build. Maybe you can find out who the builder was.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
10,798
Northern NJ
Nothing in the pic shows any cracks or gaps in the deck or fence that would indicate the ground settled recently.

Does that slope extend to the neighbors property in that corner? How widespread is the slope? Are there any utility easements or lines running underground along that area?
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
10,798
Northern NJ
If I do manage to find out the builder? What can I do with that information? Sorry to sound ignorant.
Learn how the pool was constructed. Walls steel or fiberglass or wood? Concrete put around it? What was it backfilled with? He have plans on file? Was the ground level when installed? Does he remember anything about the ground condition? Etc.
 
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Rich D

Bronze Supporter
Aug 3, 2018
582
MA
I have been in the excavation industry for 35 years so my professional opinion of what you have there is a sink hole from the original builder. Sleezy builders will have the excavators bury stumps of even worse all the trash from the development. I have walked off more than a few jobs when asked to that. Depending on the extent of the earth work they can have some very large excavators on site and will can bury the debris up to 20' in the ground. It sounds like just about the correct time frame for the debris to start rotting and sinking. Depending on the material sometimes it is difficult for a inexperienced excavator to determine "virgin ground" when digging the pool. Ask around the neighborhood to see if others are starting to see similar issues.
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
1,188
NY
Greetings fellow Islander. Looks like the property has been sloped since the dawn of time, but that corner of the pool has sunk. I know 2 people that had the exact same problem, at about the same age. One did a total tear out and the other is still using it several years later. If you have cement walls its possible they can cut back 15 ft each way from the corner and pour a new level section. If its 15 year old steel, the whole pool probaby needs redoing. But it could very well stay exactly how it is forever.
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
1,188
NY
If the liner is original, it will probaby need replacing in the next few years anyway. Start saving now and hopefully it stays where it is until then.
 

Rich D

Bronze Supporter
Aug 3, 2018
582
MA
Unfortunately all you really have now is speculation. I would suggest getting a test boring done. This will tell you exactly what is down below so you can make the correct decision on how to proceed. If the boring shows solid material below then there is a good chance the settling has stopped. If it shows buried debris then it will definitely keep settling and I would not invest any money in a new liner or attempted pool repair without removing the debris and replacing with compacted structural fill material which unfortunately could be a very expensive task.
 

Newdude

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2019
1,188
NY
Yes I was assuming that fixing the ground underneath the pool was understood to be part of the repair project. No reason to even try if you aren’t going to ensure the next one doesn’t collapse too. Sorry I wasn’t clearer.