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Thread: terminolgy question

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    terminolgy question

    New pool and spa owner. I read the signatures of those who moderate and post here and see what kind of equipment they have compared to mine. I notice many have a separate pump for the spa and some say "therapy jets" in referencing the jets in the spa.

    My pool has one pump for the pool and spa. I just turn the valves and the returns stop in the pool and start in the spa. I have no "therapy jets", just 6 eyeball type returns in the spa. They look like the same ones in the pool. When they activate in the spa they blow bubbles along with the water. When I turn on the blower they really blow water and bubbles.

    The question is, should you have a separate pump for the spa? Whats the advantage either way? and whats the difference between therapy jets and the regular eyeball type returns?

    Just want to know, thanks!!
    25,000 gallon freeform inground gunite pool with 12" raised spa. 3.5'- 6.4' deep.
    2 skimmers, 6 returns and bubbler on sunshelf.
    Jandy 1.5 hp pump, Jandy valves, Jandy CL340 cart filter, Jandy Aquapure 1400 SWG, Polaris 280 w booster, Jandy LXI 4000 heater.
    White plaster, flagstone coping, custom tan tiles with decos on raised spa.
    Pentair lights.
    650 sq ft concrete deck.

  2. Back To Top    #2
    spishex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Hillsborough, NC
    Posts
    1,375

    Re: terminolgy question

    As with everything, it depends... In this case on the water flow from your pump. If you can get us a description of your pump and filter it'll make this whole thing less theoretical, but here goes.

    You have 6 jets. Let's say they can each handle 30 gallons per minute max and require about 15 gpm to be worthwhile. That means you'd need to be sending 90-180 gpm to the jets. That's a respectable amount of water, but there are plenty of residential systems that go over 100, just depends on your equipment.

    The benefits of the separate pump are less head (higher water flow) and consistency. Since it's not plumbed into the filter you get less restriction and a steady flow (the filter isn't getting dirtier as you operate it).

    The difference between your jets and a standard return is that a return is stationary and meant to circulate a body of water. A jet is made to hit a body of a human being. Pool returns typically handle more water flow than a spa jet.

    So should you install a dedicated pump? Depends on if you want stronger jets and whether or not your setup can handle it. Some people like the massaging action, other people just like to sweat. What's your preference and how do you like it as it is?

  3. Back To Top    #3

    Re: terminolgy question

    My main pump is Jandy 1.5hp. When I turn the valves to the spa, the 6 eyeball jets are very strong and give a good invigorating massage. When I turn on the blower it really kicks it up. No problems at all. I just didnt know why many of you list a separate pump for the spa. My PB never asked me if I wanted one or told me I needed one.

    I guess 1 pump limits you to either running the spa or pool returns separately. 2 pumps you can do both at the same time. If you have water features you may need 3 to run everything at once. Correct?

    My PB also talked me out of multi speed or computer run pumps. He said the difference in initial cost and the energy saved would be offset by the life span and replacement cost compared to a single speed pump.
    Replacing a $400 pump every few years is less than one that costs $1200+ even factoring in the energy savings. Do you find this to be somewhat true?
    25,000 gallon freeform inground gunite pool with 12" raised spa. 3.5'- 6.4' deep.
    2 skimmers, 6 returns and bubbler on sunshelf.
    Jandy 1.5 hp pump, Jandy valves, Jandy CL340 cart filter, Jandy Aquapure 1400 SWG, Polaris 280 w booster, Jandy LXI 4000 heater.
    White plaster, flagstone coping, custom tan tiles with decos on raised spa.
    Pentair lights.
    650 sq ft concrete deck.

  4. Back To Top    #4
    JasonLion's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Silver Spring, MD
    Posts
    37,887

    Re: terminolgy question

    Pumps usually last a long time, ten to twenty years. There can be exceptions, sometimes a pump fails early, but the average life span is quite long. A two speed pump just about always saves money over a single speed pump. A variable speed pump will save money in the long run unless you have very low electrical rates, and a variable speed pump can really save a great deal of money if you have high electrical rates.

    The usual reason to have two pumps is to optimize each pump for the job it needs to do. A pool typically only needs 3/4 HP, while a spa needs 1 1/2 to 3 HP. Using a larger than necessary pump on the pool can lead to substantially higher energy costs and forces you to get a larger and more expensive filter.
    19K gal, vinyl, 1/2 HP WhisperFlo pump, 200 sqft cartridge filter, AutoPilot Digital SWG, Dolphin Dynamic cleaning robot
    Creator of PoolMath and Pool Calculator. Other handy links: Support this site, TF Test Kits, Pool School

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