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Thread: Bleach Tablets

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    Bleach Tablets

    I'm a newbie so I can ask this question with out fear of ridicule.

    I was in the pool dept at my local Home Depot and saw these "Magic Bleach Tabs". They are 10 tablets that claim if you add 1 gallon of water per tablet you get one gallon of bleach. It retails for $2.49 You've heard the saying, too good to be true. The package does not state the percentage of the active ingredient but it does say sodium dichloride? The safety material sheet states it is NaCDD

    With all the posts and topics I have read on the BBB method, Why hasn't anyone mentioned this whether good or bad?

    http://www.basic-solutions.co.uk/bleachtabs.html
    http://www.basic-solutions.co.uk/COSSH% ... 20Tabs.pdf
    20x40 24,000 gal IG plaster/CircuPool RJ45 SWG/2 skimmer/2sp 2.5hp Jandy Stealth/340sq ft cart filter/600sqftHeliocol Solar Panels/6ft semi circlr tanning ledge/25ft deep end bench/5ft sheer descent/2 lion head water features/1300sqft travertine paver/2 Colorlogic lights/Hayward Navigator/3step 2ft raised bond beam

  2. Back To Top    #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    San Rafael, CA USA
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    12,085
    NaDCC is Sodium DiChloroisoCyanurate where I've capitalized where the NaDCC comes from ("Na" is the chemical symbol for sodium). This is Dichlor. For every 1 ppm FC you get from Dichlor, you also get 0.9 ppm CYA. So you can very easily build up too much Cyanuric Acid (CYA) in your pool by using this product.
    16,000 gallon outdoor in-ground 16'x32' plaster pool; Pentair Intelliflo VF pump; Pentair IntelliTouch i9+3s control system; Jandy CL-340 square foot cartridge filter
    12 Fafco solar panels; Purex Triton PowerMax 250 natural gas heater (200,000 BTU/hr output); automatic electric pool safety cover; 4-wheel pressure-side "The Pool Cleaner"

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    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Coastalish 'down easter'
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    JCJR, welcome here!! Chem Geek is most always right (when he's not - HE edits for the correction, that he usually catches without it being pointed out) - in other words, listen to him!!. I find myself quoting his responses when talking to customers about water chemistry (I just hope I remember the chem reactions/ values correctly )

    BTW- Newbie or not, ask any question you have, "the only dumb question is the one unasked" The folks here are patient with newbies and have probably asked a similar ? at some point
    Luv& Luk
    -Ted

    Having done construction and service for 4 pool companies in 4 states starting in 1988, what I know about pools could fill a couple of books - what I don't know could fill a couple of libraries :-D

    POOL SCHOOL, TF Testkits, Jason's Pool Calculator, CYA vs. cl chart, (Just a few DARNED handy links!)

  4. Back To Top    #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    San Rafael, CA USA
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    12,085
    Regarding BBB, you can learn a lot about it by looking at The Pool Forum website. This site came from that one because The Pool Forum doesn't accept new members anymore and is not visible to Europe and Australia plus other reasons. This post talks about BBB specifically. There are two aspects to BBB. One is that it uses store-bought chemicals that are equivalent to what is found at pool stores and mostly does this IF the store-bought version is at a lower price. The other aspect is that it focuses on using bleach or chlorinating liquid (again, whichever is less expensive for the amount of chlorine you get) as the primary source of chlorine.

    The main advantages are that using bleach or chlorinating liquid results in adding only chlorine to your pool, not other chemicals. Almost every other source of chlorine adds something else to your pool. The exception is lithium hypochlorite, but that's 5 times more expensive for the same amount of chlorine (not by weight, but by how much actual chlorine gets into the pool). The other chlorine sources are Trichlor and Dichlor that both add significant amounts of Cyanuric Acid (CYA) to the pool while another chlorine source is Calcium Hypochlorite, or Cal-Hypo for short, and it adds Calcium to the pool that will raise the Calcium Hardness (CH) level. You need both CYA and CH in pools -- the issue is that these do not disappear quickly the way that chlorine does so you can end up building up these quantities too much. This all depends on how much dilution is going on in your pool such as from backwashing, rain overflow and splash-out. So by using bleach or chlorinating liquid, you can more easily maintain chemical balance by keeping CYA and CH levels in check, especially for larger pools and pools with cartridge filters.

    High CYA levels, in particular, require higher Free Chlorine (FC) levels to prevent algae so typically people using Trichlor without an algaecide very often find that they get algae in their pools by the middle to end of the swimming season. You can spend more money using a weekly algaecide, but maintaining proper chlorine levels will prevent algae without any need for an algaecide. Since maintaining higher FC levels gets more costly (since about half of the FC gets used up by breakdown from sunlight on a strong summer day), using bleach or chlorinating liquid lets you keep the CYA level constant so you can keep the FC level at a lower level and therefore be able to add less chlorine daily than you would if you were using Trichlor.

    The main disadvantage to using bleach or chlorinating liquid is that it is less convenient because an uncovered outdoor pool will usually need chlorine added to it every single day. With the Trichlor and Cal-Hypo products, you can get slow-dissolving tablets and these can be used in floating dispensers or in inline feeders (those two chemicals should NEVER be mixed together concentrated EVER) so may let you go several days or a week without having to manually add more chlorine. If you use a pool cover, then with bleach or chlorinating liquid you can usually go several days, so twice a week, adding more chlorine. Finally, bleach or chlorinating liquid is the least dense form of chlorine so it's heavier to carry (for the same amount of chlorine content) than other sources of chlorine.
    16,000 gallon outdoor in-ground 16'x32' plaster pool; Pentair Intelliflo VF pump; Pentair IntelliTouch i9+3s control system; Jandy CL-340 square foot cartridge filter
    12 Fafco solar panels; Purex Triton PowerMax 250 natural gas heater (200,000 BTU/hr output); automatic electric pool safety cover; 4-wheel pressure-side "The Pool Cleaner"

  5. Back To Top    #5
    ChemGeek,

    So if I use a Solar Cover then the chlorine will not break down as fast as not using a cover? I asked this question in another post due to living in Miami and I have been adding .5 a gal every 2-3 days since I had my pool built ( completed April 20th).
    I have been reading the Pool Forum for 6 months now but as you stated, I couldn't post cuz registration was closed. ( I have already thanked SeanB for this forum because now the newbies can ask questions) I have been using the BBB method because it makes sense.

    Also, thanks for the explanation of the differences in all the Chlorine products.
    20x40 24,000 gal IG plaster/CircuPool RJ45 SWG/2 skimmer/2sp 2.5hp Jandy Stealth/340sq ft cart filter/600sqftHeliocol Solar Panels/6ft semi circlr tanning ledge/25ft deep end bench/5ft sheer descent/2 lion head water features/1300sqft travertine paver/2 Colorlogic lights/Hayward Navigator/3step 2ft raised bond beam

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