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Thread: Adding heat pump - need electrical

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    Lightbulb Adding heat pump - need electrical

    I purchased this heat pump for the pool (about 17k gallons)
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Electrical work is the one thing I don't really DIY - and the required power for a heat pump isn't really where I want to start

    However, I was considering doing some of the work before bringing an electrician out, maybe to ease the blow of the final bill.

    My tentative plan is to add a sub-panel near the pool - there is currently only a circuit for the pump that run directly into the house. I'd like to eventually have full control of the pool equipment right from the pool.

    Anyone with more electrical know-how have suggestions? The heater says it needs 240v, I assume that means a 220v dedicated circuit. How many amps? How many amps should the subpanel be rated for?

    How much is this going to cost me? It'll probably be a 30-40ft run from the main box, no trenching or anything, just conduit on the side of the house.

    If i'm making any assumptions that are way off base, please correct me!

    -Tom

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    n240sxguy's Avatar
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    Re: Adding heat pump - need electrical

    I'm currently running conduit and wire out to a subpanel at my pool. Grand total for me doing the work and renting a trencher is gonna be right around $600 for the 200ft run. I'd think you'd probably have a 60amp service out there. Based on my prices, that would be around $150 for materials, plus labor. $300-400 would be my guess for having it done.


    30K gallon IG vinyl. 1.5HP 2-speed Waterway Mustang pump. 600 lb sand filter. Polaris 280. Circupool SI-60+. TF-100

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    CJadamec's Avatar
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    Re: Adding heat pump - need electrical

    You will need a 60 amp service just for the heat pump. If you are going to run the rest of your equipment off the same panel you will likely need 80amps supplied to the panel.
    If you are looking to add an automation panel at the same time the panel alone will likely be 300+ depending on the control options you choose.
    You could easily be over 1000+ dollars for material and installation from a licensed installer for a full automation panel with enough capacity to power the heat pump.

    If you are just running the power for the heat pump n240 is probably pretty close but I would have estimated closer to 600.

    Make sure to find and electrician familiar with the requirements for pool wiring. There are some specific rules for pool subpanels that don't apply to standard residential wiring.
    Chuck-
    15x30 AG, Pentair Superflo VS, 19" sand filter, TF-100 test kit
    Aqua Comfort ACT750 heat pump / 6x20 ground mount solar panel / DIY automation

    Photos of 2016 Build, Inside Your Breaker Panel, Free Copy of 2017 NEC code
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    Re: Adding heat pump - need electrical

    Thanks for the responses!

    Quote Originally Posted by CJadamec View Post
    Make sure to find and electrician familiar with the requirements for pool wiring. There are some specific rules for pool subpanels that don't apply to standard residential wiring.
    What questions should I ask to see if they know about the pool specific regulations?

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    CJadamec's Avatar
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    Re: Adding heat pump - need electrical

    Specifically NEC code section 680 covers wiring for pools and spas. None of it is all that difficult or demanding but if you aren't familiar with it you can easily make mistakes. Some highlights include:
    Isolation of bonding and grounding loops
    proper bonding of equipment to the pool/water
    Use of only insulated ground conductors which means you cant use direct burial wire
    GFCI protection for all equipment touching the water and any outlets within 5 feet of the pool. This means gfci breakers for 220v pumps and heaters.

    There's a lot more to that code section but those some of the more common mistakes that are made. Large heat pumps have high current demands so make sure your electrician knows everything you intend to power so they can size the wire run accordingly. Excessive voltage drop from a wire that is undersized is a very good way to get premature equipment failure.
    Chuck-
    15x30 AG, Pentair Superflo VS, 19" sand filter, TF-100 test kit
    Aqua Comfort ACT750 heat pump / 6x20 ground mount solar panel / DIY automation

    Photos of 2016 Build, Inside Your Breaker Panel, Free Copy of 2017 NEC code
    TFP is AD Free and is funded solely by member support click here to help

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    Re: Adding heat pump - need electrical

    Quote Originally Posted by CJadamec View Post
    Specifically NEC code section 680 covers wiring for pools and spas. None of it is all that difficult or demanding but if you aren't familiar with it you can easily make mistakes. Some highlights include:
    Isolation of bonding and grounding loops
    proper bonding of equipment to the pool/water
    Use of only insulated ground conductors which means you cant use direct burial wire
    GFCI protection for all equipment touching the water and any outlets within 5 feet of the pool. This means gfci breakers for 220v pumps and heaters.

    There's a lot more to that code section but those some of the more common mistakes that are made. Large heat pumps have high current demands so make sure your electrician knows everything you intend to power so they can size the wire run accordingly. Excessive voltage drop from a wire that is undersized is a very good way to get premature equipment failure.


    Wow, great info. Thanks! Neither the HVAC guy or Electrician that I've talked to so far has gotten back to me with a quote yet. I have a friend of a friend coming to take a look hopefully this week.

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