TFP recommendations can void equipment warranties?

rlab

Member
Oct 4, 2019
16
Australia
The TFP CYA/FC recommendations make a lot of sense to me, but as a newbie planning my first pool I am worried that TFP recommendations appear to void many equipment warranties.

For example Zodiac (Australia) has the following exclusion that applies to *all* its equipment:

Maximum chlorine readings should not exceed 4ppm. Where pool water is not maintained within these parameters, Zodiac Australia will not be responsible under this express warranty for any resulting damage, including damage caused by corrosion, scaling or stress loading.

Has anyone ever found this to be an issue in practice? I guess you could just stop chlorinating for a while if you need to make a warranty claim...
 

YippeeSkippy

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 17, 2012
12,432
Evans, Georgia
I'll be honest here... if I ever had a problem needing some sort of warranty work in person and the device/pool in question had such silly requirements, you can bet your bippee that my water would meet those requirements on the day they came to do whatever work.... <cough cough>

Then I'd go back to doing it the way it should be done.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
12,801
Northern NJ
The paragraph you quoted says nothing about voiding the warranty for replacement or repair of failed equipment due to chemistry levels. It discusses damage to pools which I think is difficult to prove or collect on regardless of water levels.

If that warranty concerns you maybe you should consider other manufacturers equipment who have more scientific based warranty terms not driven by lawyers looking to provide reasons not to honor warranties.
 
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rlab

Member
Oct 4, 2019
16
Australia
The paragraph you quoted says nothing about voiding the warranty for replacement or repair of failed equipment due to chemistry levels
To keep it short I didn't post the whole warranty. It *is* about the equipment, it is in the section on conditions under which a claim (on equipment) can be made.
If that warranty concerns you maybe you should consider other manufacturers equipment
That's the problem, all the big manufacturers have clauses like that. For example Pentair has this clause, again on *all* its equipment:

Pentair - Exceptions that may result in denial of a warranty claim:
...

06 Damage caused by failure to maintain water chemistry in conformity with the standards of the swimming pool industry for any length of time.

A lookup of standards from any of the industry bodies recommend 1 - 3ppm (or 2- 4ppm) FC. As is often the case with warranties nothing is set in stone, but FC levels above 4 still seem like a way that manufacturers could reject a claim.
 

Katodude

Silver Supporter
Aug 22, 2017
570
West Palm Beach/Florida
I cant believe I would ever see the day when a warranty repair guy comes to my house to fix a broken part and tests my water first. And just in case I would prescribe to what Maddie says, the day they come over my pool water will match their parameters.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
17,325
Anything damaged by poor chemistry is usually obvious.

If a service technician determines that the damage is chemistry related, they will then test the water.

If the water chemistry is way off, that will support the diagnosis.

If the chemistry is balanced, that doesn't invalidate a conclusion that chemistry is to blame.

A current test only determines what the current chemistry is, not what it was prior to the current test.

If you want to dispute the conclusion that chemistry is to blame, you would need to provide independent test results that establish how the chemistry has been maintained or reasons why the damage is not consistent with bad chemistry.