Removing DE From Pool

BadFriend

Member
Jun 22, 2016
16
Fairfax, VA
Hi everyone! Let me start out by saying that I am new to pools and have been researching as much as I can. I've reached the point where I feel like I've learned a lot but need to ask for some help regarding an issue I'm having.

A little background: I "inherited" the maintenance of my in-laws neglected pool. They have been opening, treating, and closing it every year, but have paid little attention to ongoing maintenance or proper procedures.

Long story short, the grids on the DE filter were damaged and I have a lot of DE in our pool water. If I run the automatic vacuum it stirs it up and makes the water extremely cloudy. If I let it settle for a day or so the water clears but there is a large amount settled on the bottom of the pool. My water tests show that all of my chemical levels are fine, the only problem I have is the sediment in the pool.

Yesterday (6/21) I had the grids of the DE filter professionally replaced and charged and now I am wondering what is the best way to go about getting the sediment out of the pool? Brushing? Vacuuming? Or do I need to drain the pool completely? (<--I really don't want to do this).

If it's helpful, here are a few pictures and stats:

Wide View of the Pool
Oyny2L2.jpg


Sediment on the Bottom 1

xwv2hiq.jpg


Sediment on the Bottom 2
fIzuzQq.jpg


Filter (FNS 60 Plus)

nl8idyU.jpg


Returns

3rYbz1E.jpg


Thanks in advance for any and all help. Also, if I posted this in the wrong section of the forum I apologize.
 

VikingPoolMan

In The Industry
Jun 15, 2016
62
Tampa
That automatic vacuum I saw in your picture won't do the trick (as you've stated).... get a pool pole with a vacuum head and vacuum the bottom directly out to waste. Here's the steps:
1. Turn everything off and let D.E. settle at the bottom
2. With the system still off, gently put your manual vacuum head (that is attached to the pole) and vacuum hose into the pool (make sure all air is out of the vac hose)... plug the other end of your hose into your skimmer.
here's a pic of the type of vacuum you should use:
poolvac.jpg
3. Set your multiport to the "waste" position (if you do not have a multiport, take a picture of your equipment).
4. Isolate your skimmer (do this by turning all the intake valves to the 'off position' except for the skimmer valve - it should be open all the way).
5. Make sure your pump basket is clean and the turn your pump on.
6. Slowly vacuum the bottom of your pool ... this will suck all the D.E. up and blast it out to waste.


Isoloate your skimmer


Hi everyone! Let me start out by saying that I am new to pools and have been researching as much as I can. I've reached the point where I feel like I've learned a lot but need to ask for some help regarding an issue I'm having.

A little background: I "inherited" the maintenance of my in-laws neglected pool. They have been opening, treating, and closing it every year, but have paid little attention to ongoing maintenance or proper procedures.

Long story short, the grids on the DE filter were damaged and I have a lot of DE in our pool water. If I run the automatic vacuum it stirs it up and makes the water extremely cloudy. If I let it settle for a day or so the water clears but there is a large amount settled on the bottom of the pool. My water tests show that all of my chemical levels are fine, the only problem I have is the sediment in the pool.

Yesterday (6/21) I had the grids of the DE filter professionally replaced and charged and now I am wondering what is the best way to go about getting the sediment out of the pool? Brushing? Vacuuming? Or do I need to drain the pool completely? (<--I really don't want to do this).

If it's helpful, here are a few pictures and stats:

Wide View of the Pool
Sediment on the Bottom 1
Sediment on the Bottom 2
Filter (FNS 60 Plus)
Returns

Thanks in advance for any and all help. Also, if I posted this in the wrong section of the forum I apologize.
 

jblizzle

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 19, 2010
43,238
Tucson, AZ
Thanks!

So to remove the DE, you are just going to have to vacuum it either to "waste" or into the filter and then do a backwash when the pressure rises 20-25% over the clean pressure ... and then recharge the filter with DE.
Check out: Use and Care of DE Filters

Another note, your chemistry is certainly not "fine" because I can see algae on the walls.

What test kit are you using?

Please add your pool details to your signature as described HERE as it will help us help you.
 

BadFriend

Member
Jun 22, 2016
16
Fairfax, VA
Thanks!

So to remove the DE, you are just going to have to vacuum it either to "waste" or into the filter and then do a backwash when the pressure rises 20-25% over the clean pressure ... and then recharge the filter with DE.
Check out: Use and Care of DE Filters

Another note, your chemistry is certainly not "fine" because I can see algae on the walls.

What test kit are you using?

Please add your pool details to your signature as described HERE as it will help us help you.

Thanks for the reply!

I'm ordering a test kit and it's on the way, so in the meantime I've been taking a sample to my local pool store. Here's my report:

FAC - 5ppm
TAC - 5
Cal Hardness - 390
CYA - 35
TA - 80
pH - 7.4
TDS - 700
Phosphates - 300

I saw the algae "ring" around the pool, I'm waiting on the pool brush to arrive so I can scrub it off. But I thought my numbers looked solid for the most part. Where am I going wrong?

I've edited my signature with the information that I know as of right now. I'll update it when I gather more info.

- - - Updated - - -

Viking, thanks for the reply. I definitely have one of those vacuums so later today I'll get it hooked up and try to vacuum to waste as you and jblizzle have suggested.
 

BadFriend

Member
Jun 22, 2016
16
Fairfax, VA
That snap shot of numbers looks fine, but historically it must not have been since algae started.

That algae right has been there since the pool was opened. I just assumed it was a stain when I saw my test numbers :(

Once you have the kit, post up real numbers and then you need to follow the ShockLevelAndMAINTAIN Process.

Will do.

Follow up question: Should I wait to vacuum the DE off the bottom until after I've scrubbed the algae and/or run an at home test? Or does it matter? I ask because I'm assuming I'm going to lose a decent amount of water during the vacuum to waste process and figured I would need to add fresh water (city water) and adjust my levels from there. My plan was to scrub the algae, vacuum the DE, refill the pool, test, adjust as necessary. Am I far off?
 

jblizzle

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 19, 2010
43,238
Tucson, AZ
I would get the DE and any other debris out and the filter clean and ready for when you start the SLAM.

I think your plan sounds good, but you could just vacuum to the filter and then backwash and recharge to lose less water.
Also, add SLAM after the "adjust as necessary" ;)
 

Enjoying this content?

Support TFP with a donation.

Give Support

BadFriend

Member
Jun 22, 2016
16
Fairfax, VA
Thanks to all for the suggestions! For the anyone still around, I've got some further questions and an update to the situation.

Questions first -

1. I have some questions about water testing and pool chemistry. Should I create a seperate post for that in the appropriate subsection of the TFP forum or should I ask them here?

2. I still have "something" on the plaster of the pool. It looks like sediment, but I can't brush it away. I'm using a nylon/stainless steel hybrid brush. Should I get an all SS brush and try that? Or is it something else? Here's a picture of the steps to show what I'm talking about. You can see the top step looks "normal" whereas all the other steps have some sort of issue.
BfsgLnW.jpg


Here's a picture of the bench, if that's any help.

7cPGtkB.jpg


Update - I vacuumed the pool on Wednesday and brushed the pool and cleaned the filter yesterday. For anyone interested, here is comparison:

Before
Oyny2L2.jpg


After
nEHMdjH.jpg

6LsWh6Y.jpg


You can see how in the Before photo the drains in the deep end are barely visible, due to the murky water filled with DE. The bottom of the pool was also completely filled with settled DE. Although the shadows make the After photos look a little wonky, now there isn't any visible sediment on the bottom (at least not much) and you can see all the way to the bottom.

I plan to vacuum again today.


Thanks again!
 

BadFriend

Member
Jun 22, 2016
16
Fairfax, VA
Could be calcium scaling then.

What are you test results?

I'm still waiting for my kit to arrive, so I'll have to give you test result from my pool store (Leslie's):

FC: 1
CH: 200
CYA: 55
TA: 120
pH: 7.4

Some additional information: I just vacuumed the pool to waste a few days ago and refilled with tap water. I don't know how much water was lost, but the level dropped by at least 3 inches, maybe more.

Also, my father in law has been taking care of this pool for the past 20 years, until I took over recently. He's never measured or tested anything. He basically pours in a ton of CalHypo at the beginning of the season and then throws in more CalHypo or scoops of dichlor whenever he feels like it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

zea3

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2009
13,994
Houston, Texas
I would not be surprised if your CH is actually much higher when you get your test kit. High CH and high pH can lead to scale very quickly. Was the pH high when you opened the pool?
 

BadFriend

Member
Jun 22, 2016
16
Fairfax, VA
I would not be surprised if your CH is actually much higher when you get your test kit. High CH and high pH can lead to scale very quickly. Was the pH high when you opened the pool?

My FIL opened the pool and he never tested anything, so I'm not sure. The pool was opened 6/1. Before I vacuumed recently I had the water tested on 6/11 and the CH was 390. pH was the same.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

1955House

Member
May 9, 2016
16
Burlington, MA
May I ask a dumb question? I am new to pool ownership (2nd season) so I'm still pretty naive (this site it teaching me quickly ;)). Why/how could the pool store's readings be off when done digitally (at least on a computer) vs. when done using a test kit? Is that a comment on just Leslie's, or pool stores' testing methods in general?

I would not be surprised if your CH is actually much higher when you get your test kit.
 

jblizzle

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 19, 2010
43,238
Tucson, AZ
Because the computer calibration was never done or done incorrectly. The vials were not properly cleaned. The operator had no idea what he is doing. Etc etc
 

Enjoying this content?

Support TFP with a donation.

Give Support
Thread Status
Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.