Pool Pad

GusGus

Gold Supporter
Aug 17, 2018
34
League City/TX
#1
Since my build is on hold for a few weeks due to permitting I wanted to get a jump on my pool equipment pad. The pool pad for equipment needs to be at least 3'X10' according to plumber, I'm also moving the A/C condenser to that area which will need another 4". total size would be 3'X14' The 2 options I see is purchasing some pre-fab pads or building the pad. The cost will be about the same since this will be a DIY project. It would be just a lot more work if I build the pad. Main question is do you want the pad permanently install or do you want the flexibility to move pad around for when they install the plumbing and equipment?
 

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
10,919
Bedford, TX
#2
Gus,

I am not a fan of pre-fab pads, but each to their own... Just make sure that you don't bring any plumbing up through a pad and keep in mind that when you drain your filter, the water needs a place to go... Either a place to run off or plumbing of some type.

I would also make the pad bigger than your think you need.. For some reason plumbers think the smaller an equipment is the better.. I guess it is because they never have to work on them later. I want to be able to repair or upgrade things without having to replace half of my valves... :)

Thanks,

Jim R.
 

scdaren

Bronze Supporter
May 20, 2018
319
Clovis, CA
#3
I think you'll be better off with a poured concrete pad, especially with your A/C condenser on it. I also moved our A/C when we built the pool, and have a heat pump on it. It's on part of my deck. Before the deck was poured I had my fence contractor put in the fence posts to go around the pad, then equipment was all set after deck was poured, and fencing finished at the end. Waiting for the deck did not end up adding any extra time to the project, though I was eager as well seeing all that equipment sitting in boxes on my patio.



29955989468_0bb71dc182_z.jpg
 

Arizonarob

Gold Supporter
Silver Supporter
TFP Guide
Mar 25, 2018
1,578
Chandler Arizona
#4
Gus, one major thing to keep in mind if you’re planning on moving your a/c unit to the pad, is clearance. There needs to be a min amount of clearance on all sides of the unit, (per manufacturer specs) so the unit will operate to its seer rating.
Also, depending on how old your current unit is, the new ones are massive in size compared to older ones. As the manufacturers continue to gain larger seer numbers, the units will keep getting bigger. So to plan for the future unit upgrade, you will need a much larger footprint.
:cheers:
 
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OP
GusGus

GusGus

Gold Supporter
Aug 17, 2018
34
League City/TX
#5
Gus,

I am not a fan of pre-fab pads, but each to their own... Just make sure that you don't bring any plumbing up through a pad and keep in mind that when you drain your filter, the water needs a place to go... Either a place to run off or plumbing of some type.

I would also make the pad bigger than your think you need.. For some reason plumbers think the smaller an equipment is the better.. I guess it is because they never have to work on them later. I want to be able to repair or upgrade things without having to replace half of my valves... :)

Thanks,

Jim R.
Thanks
I was thinking of increasing it to 4' X 14' but was not sure this will effect the plumbing install with a bigger pad. I guess I' see if the plumber will come by to take a look to make sure. This way he is not bring plumbing through pad.

I think you'll be better off with a poured concrete pad, especially with your A/C condenser on it. I also moved our A/C when we built the pool, and have a heat pump on it. It's on part of my deck. Before the deck was poured I had my fence contractor put in the fence posts to go around the pad, then equipment was all set after deck was poured, and fencing finished at the end. Waiting for the deck did not end up adding any extra time to the project, though I was eager as well seeing all that equipment sitting in boxes on my patio.



View attachment 93556
This is the same setup I'm looking to have except I want a concrete block wall with tile face. but not sure I'll have time to get it up before they install the Intellicenter panel so I my just have to go with wood for now.
 
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OP
GusGus

GusGus

Gold Supporter
Aug 17, 2018
34
League City/TX
#6
Gus, one major thing to keep in mind if you’re planning on moving your a/c unit to the pad, is clearance. There needs to be a min amount of clearance on all sides of the unit, (per manufacturer specs) so the unit will operate to its seer rating.
Also, depending on how old your current unit is, the new ones are massive in size compared to older ones. As the manufacturers continue to gain larger seer numbers, the units will keep getting bigger. So to plan for the future unit upgrade, you will need a much larger footprint.
:cheers:
I plan to give it as much room as possible for the reasons you stated because a upgrade is due in near future. ugh
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
2,591
Damascus, MD
#7
I suggest a prefab plastic pad, which I can't believe is anywhere close to the cost of a poured pad. All of my pool equipment pad (2 pads) and both my A/C units sit on plastic pre-fab pads. Once they are in place, you will never know what they are made of. Just level a spot and put them down.
 
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GusGus

GusGus

Gold Supporter
Aug 17, 2018
34
League City/TX
#9
I was talking to the plumber that I have for this job. He told me to just wait on pad. That when they dig out the pool and I can get the guys to also prep area for pad. Then frame it and and re-bar guys add re-bar and then shot it with gunite when they are here. This sound like a much easier plan than doing my self.
 

jimmythegreek

Bronze Supporter
Aug 10, 2017
515
Morris Cnty NJ
#13
Pouring a pad is pretty simple. But the plumber is right throw a few bucks to the sub and have them do the slab. Same money as buying the concrete and ur labor and it will be better they work w it everyday. Slab is best the pads move and settle especially in cold climates or clay soils