Need help with DIY major vermiculite repair

#1
Hi all,

This is my first post, and I am new here, but I am hoping someone can help out.

We just purchased a house with a vinyl liner pool. The liner was ripped and we noticed large "indentations" in the side walls in the deep end.
We cut out the liner and noticed that the vermiculite that slopes from the steel panels to the hopper was eroded. From my reading, it seems like we can rebuild the vermiculite slopes to the hopper, but I have not seen anyone address such large failures.


Should we put a layer of anything down under the vermiculite? In other words, when we remove the damaged sections, do we simply re-apply the vermiculite, or do we need to put down a sand base, rock base, etc.?



damaged slope wall.jpg barnside wall deep end.jpg

Also, what do I do to fill in under the steel wall where the ground has failed? Rock? Dirt, Vermiculite, concrete? It seems like we should have a stable base for the wall to sit on.

Finally, I understand that I can grind off the rust and paint with a cold galvanizing compound. Once that is done, how high up the steel wall should we build up the vermiculite?


I also think that I should address the root cause of the problem.

I have heard that a neighbor emptied a very large pond before we bought the house. This could have created water table issues.

The land has been dry since we took possession of the property.

Still, since I am doing major repair, I am tirekicking adding a rock bed under the deep end of the hopper with a sump well adjacent to the pool to ensure that I can deal with something unknown. Moreover, I plan on adding drainage around the property. Any other ideas/suggestions?

I know this is a lot, so thank you in advance.
Tom
 

jimmythegreek

Bronze Supporter
Aug 10, 2017
397
Succasunna, NJ
#4
Depending on how stable the earth is under u can either pack concrete in there kinda dry, u could use all vermiculite, u can use road base compacted, masons mix, anything that will hold the slope. U have a concrete collar around pool wall isn't going anywhere even w that it's 24" deep behind wall 8" thick. Chip out bad been get the adjoining wet and blend it in its 2" up onto the wall just go even w sides that r good. I don't need to mess w inside pool for drains, dig a standing hole as close to deep end as possible and bury a 10" off standpipe w holes drilled alll over in clean stone and make an outdoor sump pit u can drop pump into. U can also do permanent w float setup and pipe drain amd electric underground if ur comfortable w that work
 
#5
jimmythegreek:
Thanks for the advice. After work yesterday, we emptied the water from the pool and this morning, there was about an inch of standing water in the deep end. I think tonight after work, I will dig the sump well and get that process started to see if we can resolve the ground water issues.

We are in Southwest Ohio where vermiculite is common, but I am considering having concrete poured to form at least the hopper/sloped side walls of the deep end. I am hopeful that this may save some issues should the sump not be 100% effective.

As always, advice appreciated.
 

mclifford

Well-known member
Aug 29, 2017
174
Van buren, AR
#6
jimmythegreek:
Thanks for the advice. After work yesterday, we emptied the water from the pool and this morning, there was about an inch of standing water in the deep end. I think tonight after work, I will dig the sump well and get that process started to see if we can resolve the ground water issues.

We are in Southwest Ohio where vermiculite is common, but I am considering having concrete poured to form at least the hopper/sloped side walls of the deep end. I am hopeful that this may save some issues should the sump not be 100% effective.

As always, advice appreciated.
In our area all the pool builders pour concrete for the shallow end, slope and deep end. They Vermic the hopper walls. They say when it comes to liner replacement there is much less repair work to be done.

The sump pits are very effective. If you can get it under the concrete pad in your deep end. But that would require digging under your bond beam and out. If you had a main drain you could abandon the main drain and pipe in your sump?

reference:
Inground Swimming Pool Sump System Install, Prevent Floating Liner - YouTube
 
#7
Thanks for the advice. I have obtained a few quotes to repair and builders in our area seem to shy away from concrete. Not sure why.
I am weighing the cost of hiring the job out vs taking this on myself.

We had rain last night so I decided against building a sump well. I will try again once the rain clears.

Thanks
 

Brianf60

Well-known member
May 18, 2017
114
Bradford ontario
#8
The other factor to consider is speed. How fast can it be done? 1 the season is short and 2 your pool is now sitting without water. That may cause more damage then the extra cost to have it done. Do you have a liner already?
 

PoolguyinCT

In The Industry
Jul 21, 2014
2,674
Connecticut
#9
This is what I do everyday..

All the verm needs to be pulled out, some may appear to be sitting pretty right now.. but a 1/4 million or so pounds of water are going in that hole & it will fail.