In The Dark About CC Removal!

calinb

Well-known member
Jul 18, 2018
95
N. Central, ID
Or rather my spa is in the dark (full shade gazebo-covered). Given the near absence of UV light, I've searched these forums and found a few claims that aeration removes CC, but I'd like to hear what the chem experts have to say about it. Once the FC reacts with organics and makes the stinky and nasty CC, just how does it get removed (short of water changes)?

I just made my last repair on this 18-year old spa (or at least hopefully it's the last for awhile). I had to rewire the controller, which was incorrectly wired, replace the circ pump seal and fix six other leaks. I had to drain it three times in the process ("peeling the onion")! Now it seems to be totally drip-free (and shower head spray-free) and the GFCI and other control circuits are working correctly.

Last year I got the pool up and running, which I plan to open shortly, and this year's pre-summer project has been the spa. It's good to be back online here at TFP after a long N. Central Idaho winter!
 
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calinb

Well-known member
Jul 18, 2018
95
N. Central, ID
How often do you change the water in your spa?
I just got it up and running so I haven't changed it at all yet. I've only used it once so far and afterwards I found the last leak and drained it to do the repair. I've not used it since refilling it.

That Ahh-Some stuff looks good, but I've had several hoses off the spa and they all look quite clean inside. It's been drained and dry as a bone after sitting through very cold winters and very hot summer for a few years now. It seems that anything that might have once been living in the pipes got killed off! Without using it, I'll see how it does on a OCLT tomorrow but I anticipate the CC to be zero.

My CC question is academic and perhaps for planning purposes, rather than being motivated by any present problems. According to the records I have from the last owners, they removed and didn't replace the ozonator afer it failed for the second time about seven years after they purchased the spa new (which would actually be pretty good for ozonator life, if they really functioned for the entire 7 year period ;)). I have no plans to buy an ozonator, and just wondered how aeration might help (which is how ozonators apparently "work" after their failure goes un-noticed by spa owners).