How many TFP members are going with saltwater?

woodyp

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Apr 17, 2010
10,215
East Texas
#23
Most true SWG pools are in the 3,000 ppm range or so. Over time, a bleach pool will average out around 1,500 or so. Some folks are more sensitive to salt levels than others.
 

bdex

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 3, 2014
389
Peoria, IL
#24
I would likely not have built the pool if not for the availability of swg systems. Makes maintaining the pool much easier since I am gone a lot. I add MA once a week to keep ph in check and that is really about it.


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JayBauman

LifeTime Supporter
Sep 5, 2014
617
Katy, TX
#25
Most true SWG pools are in the 3,000 ppm range or so. Over time, a bleach pool will average out around 1,500 or so. Some folks are more sensitive to salt levels than others.
This is close to what I would expect, based on some back-of-the-envelope calculations I made last night (Hey, we all can't be like ChemGeek taking things out to 34 significant figures!). Since the salt content in SWG pool is only twice that of a bleach pool, should we expect the water from an SWG pool to be practically any worse on decking and natural rocks than the water from a bleach pool? I've been trying to find an answer on this one for a few months.

(Hey MODS, place this post somewhere else if it's too "hijack-y"...
 

yostmatt

Well-known member
Jun 3, 2014
178
Hollidaysburg, PA
#27
I have chlorine. With normal daily care of, visual watch check, water testing, cleaning out the skimmer, and tossing in a few cups of bleach each day, is not a big deal for me. As I think about it, the only automation I have is, Wanda the Whale. If I had to pick one, I would pick Wanda.

Does a SWG use a large amount of electricity? or well enough to make someone shy away from it?
 

chem geek

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 28, 2007
12,082
San Rafael, CA USA
#28
Since the salt content in SWG pool is only twice that of a bleach pool, should we expect the water from an SWG pool to be practically any worse on decking and natural rocks than the water from a bleach pool?
Since the problem is with salt recrystallization pressure, the effect is non-linear (it's more like a threshold) so the factor of two difference in salt levels can be significant. On the other hand, with enough splash-out and evaporation even non-SWG pools with 1000 ppm or 1500 ppm could create a problem. Nevertheless with an SWG pool 2-3x more concentrated in salt, at a minimum any degradation would be 2-3x faster. If the rate of salt removal in cracks from summer rain vs. introduction from pool water were near balance in between non-SWG and SWG salt levels, then you could see the non-SWG not produce any significant degradation while the SWG produced significant degradation. If you get a lot of summer rain, then even the SWG salt levels would not be a problem since they would get washed-out/diluted at least as fast as splash-out built up the level.

So there are many factors that come together where the salt level in the pool is just one of them. Other factors are the rate of splash-out, the rate of evaporation (dependent on temperature and humidity), the rate of dilution (say from summer rains), the type of stone (soft stone is worse).
 

madgunner

Active member
Oct 13, 2014
27
Austin/TX
#31
Nearing the finish line with a new pool here and will use a SWG with Oklahoma Flagstone coping and a stone waterfall from the spa into the pool. In hindsight, I would've gone with a manmade masonry product to reduce the risk from salt. PB wasn't very informative, or maybe I simply missed the comments early on. Thanks to reading these forums, I'm going to take the time to seal the stone before the pool is finished.

Knowing that salt (and water in general) includes risk for natural stone (due to freeze/thaw cycles and salt expansion which can cause spalling), I'm applying DryTreat 40SK to all of the stone that will come in frequent contact with the water, such as the coping and the spa overflow/waterfall. I put almost a full gallon of 40SK into the stone around the waterfall, and bought several more gallons for the coping as the stone absorbs a lot of the sealer.

DuPont Stonetech and Deck-o-Shield Plus are two other sealers that will protect stone from salt water. I plan to use the DuPont product on some of the other areas near the pool, as I'm finding this product at a lower price online versus the 40SK. Looks like I'll need to re-apply the DuPont product in a few years, but I'm less concerned with the areas that aren't in direct contact with the water; pros/cons of DuPont versus the 40SK.
 

JayBauman

LifeTime Supporter
Sep 5, 2014
617
Katy, TX
#33
So there are many factors that come together where the salt level in the pool is just one of them. Other factors are the rate of splash-out, the rate of evaporation (dependent on temperature and humidity), the rate of dilution (say from summer rains), the type of stone (soft stone is worse).
Thanks, Chem Geek.

So I guess that in come cases (with everything else being equal), I could imagine that the salt concentration in a non-SWG pool could spall natural surfaces much like SWG can.

Next question: Is this limited to natural stone, or do concrete-based pool decks (concrete, fired pavers, etc.) have same risks, too?
 

chiefwej

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 12, 2011
3,237
Tucson
#34
I built my pool ten years ago and included a SWG. My previous home had a standard chlorine pool. The SWG pool has been wonderful by comparison. But my pool was designed and built as a salt pool. No stone anywhere. Concrete decking finished with textured vinyl surface, cantilevered edge, no coping. So there is nothing for salt to damage. After 7+years of service I had to replace the cell at a cost of about $400. That makes my annual chlorine cost less than $60, so I do believe that SWG is, or can be a cheaper way to chlorinate a pool. As far as the issue of rising pH, I used aeration and acid to lower my TA, then added borates. That has stabilized the pH.

I have had both kinds, and you can put me down as a vote for SWG.
 

JayBauman

LifeTime Supporter
Sep 5, 2014
617
Katy, TX
#36
Since I have brick coping and "regular" pool tile do you guys think the saltwater will do more damage?
My last pool had fired brick coping and "regular" pool tile. You'll be perfectly sutied for SWG. Dump in the salt and enjoy your extremely low-maintenance pool.
 

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
31,323
Sebring, Florida
#37
How many of you have manual pool but like SWG pools better.........or the opposite? There may be one or two of you out there, but just like filter types we overwhelmingly like what we currently own.....the debate never stops. :D
 

zimm

Well-known member
May 6, 2013
432
Fort Lauderdale, FL
#38
SWG! I had two algae blooms before I switched. Zero after. Two seasons with no problems. The first summer it took a little messing with the % to get it dialed in and twice the whole season I had to add acid to bring down Ph. Last summer Ph stayed 7.4 the whole season. I only had to add CYA occasionally and some Hardener as my CH drops. Never had to add bleach until it was time to close the pool. Oh, and a couple of $5 bags of Morton's pool salt to keep levels up.