How Fast does your pool water evaporate ???

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
16,241
Tucson, AZ
Ah, okay. Well that explains some of the less than average water use I guess.
Not a super "secret" lol, but I still wouldn't mind buying you a brew one of these days. :p
And we can stay right here in Chandler and not have to drive to Area 51 :laughblue:
r.
Your pool would be an interesting test case for the liquid cover pool products. Because you are able to directly measure the flow of water into your pool on a daily basis, you could apply the liquid to see how well it works. The water needs to be still, no running the pump, but it would be interesting to see if your overnight water use dropped at all with the liquid cover in place.

Then we can add jello powder and see how that works 😂
 
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MyAZPool

Gold Supporter
Jul 3, 2018
1,074
Arizona
Your pool would be an interesting test case for the liquid cover pool products. Because you are able to directly measure the flow of water into your pool on a daily basis, you could apply the liquid to see how well it works. The water needs to be still, no running the pump, but it would be interesting to see if your overnight water use dropped at all with the liquid cover in place.

Then we can add jello powder and see how that works 😂
Matt,
Funny you should mention that "Liquid Pool cover". When my neighbors pool guy (a really good guy btw), came over to inspect the installation of my new equipment (for the warranty), he recommended that product to me? I don't think I'm interested though :).. In fact, the whole "guinea pig" gig, got a little annoying after a while when Pentair was remoting into the automation to do a bunch of testing for some updates (yea, I gave em permission). Seems their automation setups are not actually connected to real equipment. Just software simulators that really don't simulate actual "real" equipment from what I understand.

I think I'm going to skip the Jello Powder for now. :p

Unless of course, were talking about something like this :laughblue:

111883 111884
 
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Saturn94

Well-known member
Mar 11, 2015
714
Virginia
You don’t say where you are in the Phoenix metro area but in the month of July, based on historical Pan evaporation data, you lose about 13” of water in the month of July. If you know your pools surface area, then you can calculate the gallons of water used -

100 cubic feet = 748 gallons
How does one find this data for their area? I did a search but no luck (SE VA).
 

MyAZPool

Gold Supporter
Jul 3, 2018
1,074
Arizona
Hi Saturn94
Use this calculator for square footage of your surface area and the total gallons.
r.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
16,241
Tucson, AZ
How does one find this data for their area? I did a search but no luck (SE VA).
Western States, being awash in sunshine but parched for water, have been collecting evapotranspiration data since the early 20th century. Where I am, the University of Arizona has maintained a class A Pan evaporation monitoring station since 1894 ... and a second station since 1982 (we love to watch water boil in the sunshine here).

You can try searching the US Geological Survey or NOAA for data but I suspect there isn’t much for Virginia as you guys likely have more precipitation than evaporation.

You can also look at the Engineering Toolbox website to get a formula for estimating your evaporative loss -

 
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Arizonarob

Gold Supporter
Silver Supporter
TFP Guide
Mar 25, 2018
3,204
Chandler Arizona
Your pool would be an interesting test case for the liquid cover pool products.
When my neighbors pool guy (a really good guy btw), came over to inspect the installation of my new equipment (for the warranty), he recommended that product to me?
Unless of course, were talking about something like this
Western States, being awash in sunshine but parched for water, have been collecting evapotranspiration data since the early 20th century.
I see a weekend project in the making. Matt can bring the Jell-O shots, I’ll bring the Corona lights, and you can supply the Kiltlifter. We can all sit by the pool, and every time Matt says something nerdy, we have to do a Jell-O shot. I suspect after about 20 mins we’ll be able to “see” the evaporation of your pool in progress.
Now of course this project is all in the name of science. (At least as far as the wives are concerned ;))
 

MyAZPool

Gold Supporter
Jul 3, 2018
1,074
Arizona
I see a weekend project in the making. Matt can bring the Jell-O shots, I’ll bring the Corona lights, and you can supply the Kiltlifter. We can all sit by the pool, and every time Matt says something nerdy, we have to do a Jell-O shot. I suspect after about 20 mins we’ll be able to “see” the evaporation of your pool in progress.
Now of course this project is all in the name of science. (At least as far as the wives are concerned ;))
Rob,
:laughblue::laughblue: :laughblue:

Jerry Seinfeld GIF
 
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Arizonarob

Gold Supporter
Silver Supporter
TFP Guide
Mar 25, 2018
3,204
Chandler Arizona
Seems their automation setups are not actually connected to real equipment. Just software simulators that really don't simulate actual "real" equipment from what I understand.
You have got to be kidding me? You mean to tell me they couldn’t walk over to the warehouse shelves and pull off a bunch of equipment to do a mock-up for their tests? :rant:
 
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Saturn94

Well-known member
Mar 11, 2015
714
Virginia
Western States, being awash in sunshine but parched for water, have been collecting evapotranspiration data since the early 20th century. Where I am, the University of Arizona has maintained a class A Pan evaporation monitoring station since 1894 ... and a second station since 1982 (we love to watch water boil in the sunshine here).

You can try searching the US Geological Survey or NOAA for data but I suspect there isn’t much for Virginia as you guys likely have more precipitation than evaporation.

You can also look at the Engineering Toolbox website to get a formula for estimating your evaporative loss -

Thanks.

I took a look at that link......eek! :oops:
 

MyAZPool

Gold Supporter
Jul 3, 2018
1,074
Arizona
You have got to be kidding me? You mean to tell me they couldn’t walk over to the warehouse shelves and pull off a bunch of equipment to do a mock-up for their tests? :rant:
Right? I was as shocked as you when I first heard that. I envisioned 4 or 5 pools, all with all kinds of equipment running and all connected to various automation systems for continuous testing etc etc.
Not so.
Oh well. :rolleyes:
 

BowserB

Silver Supporter
Jul 29, 2018
189
Katy, Texas
Not surprising or even big news. The Navy sent submarines to war after Pearl Harbor carrying torpedoes with magnetic exploders and depth keeping gear that had never been tested with a real warhead (or equivalent weight dummy warhead.) The theory was that the torpedoes would be set to a depth to run just under the target ship and explode where the steel was thinner and the ship would break apart. All in theory. Their contact exploders had not been tested either. Bureau of Ordinance blamed the sub commanders and crews for improper maintenance when torpedoes exploded short of the targets. It seems the magnetic field of a steel ship spreads out as you move farther from the north pole, so the magnetic exploders triggered before reaching their target. When they finally disconnected the magnetic exploders, they found they were not getting hits, because the torpedoes ran deeper than they were set for (remember not ever tested with the weight of a warhead in place.) When that was finally fixed, they found that the contact exploders failed. Torpedoes hit but no explosion. Eventually it was found that the contract trigger would crush when it hit squarely on the side of a steel ship, before it could travel back and hit the primer. All along, no full tests by Bureau of Ordinance, and it took Admiral Charles Lockwood ComSubPac to order live tests at Hawaii and prove the results to the D.C. "engineers" to get changes made, and it was mid 1943 before the submarine service had fully functional torpedoes. And that was the U.S. Navy and ships of war in wartime. No real tests. Lab only. So it should be only minimally surprising that swimming pool equipment would get only simulations. However, you'd think that someone there at the company would have a swimming pool they could use for field testing equipment, wouldn't you.
 

MyAZPool

Gold Supporter
Jul 3, 2018
1,074
Arizona
Not surprising or even big news. The Navy sent submarines to war after Pearl Harbor carrying torpedoes with magnetic exploders and depth keeping gear that had never been tested with a real warhead (or equivalent weight dummy warhead.) The theory was that the torpedoes would be set to a depth to run just under the target ship and explode where the steel was thinner and the ship would break apart. All in theory. Their contact exploders had not been tested either. Bureau of Ordinance blamed the sub commanders and crews for improper maintenance when torpedoes exploded short of the targets. It seems the magnetic field of a steel ship spreads out as you move farther from the north pole, so the magnetic exploders triggered before reaching their target. When they finally disconnected the magnetic exploders, they found they were not getting hits, because the torpedoes ran deeper than they were set for (remember not ever tested with the weight of a warhead in place.) When that was finally fixed, they found that the contact exploders failed. Torpedoes hit but no explosion. Eventually it was found that the contract trigger would crush when it hit squarely on the side of a steel ship, before it could travel back and hit the primer. All along, no full tests by Bureau of Ordinance, and it Admiral Charles Lockwood to order live tests at Hawaii and prove the results to the D.C. "engineers" to get changes made, and it was mid 1943 before the submarine service had fully functional torpedoes. And that was the U.S. Navy and ships of war in wartime. No real tests. Lab only. So it should be only minimally surprising that swimming pool equipment would get only simulations. However, you'd think that someone there at the company would have a swimming pool they could use for field testing equipment, wouldn't you.
BowserB
Bill, yea I have seen those facts on submarine documentaries on the History and AHC channels. Unbelievable. What arrogant incompetence, that certainly cost the lives of many a brave soul.

I would "expect" a company like Pentair to do a better job in 2019. But as usually is the case, the thinking that additional equipment, man-hours etc, reduces the bottom line. :(
Thanks much and please take care.
All the best!
r.