Electricity in basket housing

Rossterman

Well-known member
Jun 5, 2016
504
Martinez, CA
Code is the same everywhere In the US. Grounding through the panel via EGC. Bonding from the bonding lug to the water, equipment and pool structure. No connection between them is required by code anywhere in the US. The NEC specifically states that.
sorry, not clear on what you are saying. What are you referring to when you say “no connection between them is required”?
 

Rossterman

Well-known member
Jun 5, 2016
504
Martinez, CA
Right. The bonding on mine is between the exterior of the pump motor housings And the bond wire that goes to the pool. No connection to anywhere else. I think we are saying the same thing. I’m not saying they both need to be connected together- what I was saying to the OP was it needs the bonding connection installed too. What are you referring to as the egt? The electrical grounding terminal inside the power panel Right?
 

guinness

Well-known member
May 3, 2019
483
California
Let's try to simplify this for the OP. What are their options? I think we've established that they need to find another electrician that is familiar with pool bonding. Do any members from CT have any recommendations? According to Connecticut Spa & Pool Association (CONSPA) they'll need to look for an SP-1 or SP-2 license holder.
 
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JohnT

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Apr 4, 2007
9,851
SW Indiana
Right. The bonding on mine is between the exterior of the pump motor housings And the bond wire that goes to the pool. No connection to anywhere else. I think we are saying the same thing. I’m not saying they both need to be connected together- what I was saying to the OP was it needs the bonding connection installed too. What are you referring to as the egt? The electrical grounding terminal inside the power panel Right?
EGC is Equipment Grounding Conductor. Proper name for ground wire.
 

Edrock200

Member
Jul 19, 2020
17
Fairfax VA
Maybe this question is due to my lack of electrical knowledge but if you sticking your finger in the pool sent current through you to ground, why didn't your gfi trip?
 

JohnT

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Apr 4, 2007
9,851
SW Indiana
Maybe this question is due to my lack of electrical knowledge but if you sticking your finger in the pool sent current through you to ground, why didn't your gfi trip?
A GFCI has a loop around the hot and neutral and looks for a difference in current flowing in the hot and neutral. It should be exactly the same unless it’s leaking somewhere, like through you.

The problem is, a GFCI can only act on a circuit it’s installed on. The power coming through the pool could be from the neighbor’s well, a phone line, a power company line or a nearly limitless list of power sources that aren’t GFCI protected.
 

Edrock200

Member
Jul 19, 2020
17
Fairfax VA
A GFCI has a loop around the hot and neutral and looks for a difference in current flowing in the hot and neutral. It should be exactly the same unless it’s leaking somewhere, like through you.

The problem is, a GFCI can only act on a circuit it’s installed on. The power coming through the pool could be from the neighbor’s well, a phone line, a power company line or a nearly limitless list of power sources that aren’t GFCI protected.
Thank you for the explanation, and for explaining it so the average Joe like myself can understand. :) Much appreciated.