Chlorease

MikeInTN

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 27, 2007
1,335
Middle Tennessee
Thanks for the update and info, mom. I'm with you all the way on not spending the $$$ if the Intex does the job. I'm guessing that the price on the others such as the Aquatrol will come down over time as well, so when it's time to retire the CL02, I'll do some comparison shopping then. Glad to hear that you're having to run it less to maintain your FC than the instructions call for; easier on the electric bill, and the cell. :)

BTW, checked my FC and TC tonight (first time since cleaning the cell), and my FC is up to 4.6, CC is 0. Life is good. :)
 

Strannik

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 24, 2007
874
Brisbane, Australia
Poolsean said:
Strannik said:
CL01 uses what's called "convection cell"
very old technology put in a pretty package. Used to be popular in Australia in 80ies and early 90ies, but has been phased out in favour of plumbed in designs as it's very inefficient, and doesn't chlorinate pool properly.
Strannik, sorry to disagree, but the convection system is much more efficient as it has more contact time with the water than an the flow through cell. The problem was being able to place it so that it's out of the way and still provide the efficiency of the convection cell.
For instance, I have an installation, 308,000 gallon private school with about 500 kids throughout the day, using 15.4 lbs/day of chlorine to maintain it. With an inline cell system, I would have to have over 30 lbs/day to maintain this same pool.

A convection cell, properly positioned, will allow you to sanitize a large pool with a smaller cell.
The contact time is about the same, plus you get more even chlorine distribution.
Also they calcify more, since there is no water flow to help remove particles from the plates.
As i say, in Australia this technology has been phased out long time ago.
 

MikeInTN

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 27, 2007
1,335
Middle Tennessee
heikejohn said:
Just came across this post.

Has there been any new information about this unit?

Sounds like something I would like to try if it's still working in the long run.
Well, something did change - I stopped using the Chlorease and bought an Intex (and sold the Chlorease at a yard sale). My reasons for doing so: (1) cleaning the Chlorease was a pain (2) The Intex puts out more chlorine and thus I have to run it less time (3) The Intex requires a lower salt level (4) you're supposed to remove the Chlorease from the pool every year when you close for the winter, which is a pain (5) The Intex is priced roughly the same as the Clorease.

If you look in the Intex thread here, you'll see my installation. Turned out pretty good!

HTH,
Mike
 

NWMNMom

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Apr 8, 2007
1,582
Waaay NW MN
That is the one. This is also the unit I use. There are some drawbacks vs the more expensive units and some of the earlier units had a lot of issues. Mine does not have mechanical issues except that if the power goes out, you have to reset it. Other than that, it does a really fine job on my pool. The biggest thing I found was that you should have your water balance properly BEFORE starting up this unit for the season - salt, FC, PH, everything should be a good levels and then turn this on to MAINTAIN that level. You can run it longer to bring the FC levels up but it's best to use it for maintaining. If I had a bit more $$ I would be installing an Aquatrol now and will soon, simply because it is more automated. BUT, having said that - to get your feet wet in SWG if you don't have $600 - this will start you off fine. The other "hang over the wall" type units are passive units that don't pump out/through/into like the hose mounted cells do - they just hang in one spot, water that goes in or around it gets the FC produced but it is not circulated by your system except incidentally -
 

pool4me

Well-known member
Sep 3, 2008
124
Bucks County, PA
Thanks for the info (both of you).

I agree. (I'm just trying to get my feet wet with a SWG). I was looking at it as an "entry level" SWG to get started.

From what I've read, you make a ton of sense. It seems that quite a few owners don't have the levels correct when they "fire up" the SWG for the first time. It was my understanding that for maintaining the level, they work well but obviously , their design (at least the cheaper ones) don't really appear to have the ability to "shock the pool so to speak". I agree with you that the levels should be pretty much right on to begin with and then let the SWG "maintain".

I've been a big fan of the BBB method. It's been awhile since I've had my last pool. My sitework is just about done. (Just a 33x15x54 A/G but my property is built on a hill with a "stepped down rear yard, so the terrain will allow me to completly deck around the pool 2 levels down from my lower deck so that it appears to be in ground). I've got solid slate below most of the rear yard (they had to blast to excavate for a portion of my basement), so sadly an I/G is out of the question for me.) - Way off topic though.

I'm still searching for that install thread. Trying to do as much homework as I can. (Since last October!)
 

MikeInTN

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 27, 2007
1,335
Middle Tennessee
Here's the thread for the Intex SWG.

One item of note - it's best not to use a SWG for shocking the pool, regardless of whether it's an Intex or one of the bigger units, because it shortens the cell life. Best to use bleach to shock when needed, and use the SWG to maintain your normal FC.
 

pool4me

Well-known member
Sep 3, 2008
124
Bucks County, PA
Thanks Mike!

I agree with you. I didn't intend to attempt to shock the pool with the SWG. I was just making a reference that I also feel (like you do as well), that they aren't exactly suitable for that task. I've always thought that the "idea" was to get the levels right where they should be and then let the SWG maintain and do it's job. I'm always a bit amazed when I hear of owners that just fill up for the first time, then fire up the SWG and then wonder why it just does'nt "take over and load the pool with Chlorine".

I never thought that it was even possible to get the levels that high (to shock) like you mention. Do people actually do that? It would seem that you'd really be taking a toll on the cell with that type of activity... Like you mention.

Hey... I have a question for you.

I see that many users have the SWG come on during the filter cycle, (which is pretty obvious). I see while reading some of the specs online that a pump with a 2,600 GPH rating is suggested on the larger pools (Intex pools that is).

Seeing that the pumps on AG pools can exceed that, Has anyone hooked up the SWG with one of the "smaller intex pumps"? (if they desired it to come on when their regular pump was off for example).

I was just wondering if the higher GPH pumps actually cut down on efficiency of the SWG with the high flow rates. I would seem that more / slower water flow in contact with the cell would be better??? But I guess the lower the GPH, the longer the pump would have to run to "cycle" the entire pool.

Just curious about what you think about that. I'm planning to do what most others appear to be doing. Having it come on slightly before my pumps comes on, and shut off a little bit before the pump goes off. Just curious. The technical aspects of these things really interest me.
 

MikeInTN

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 27, 2007
1,335
Middle Tennessee
I can't say that I've heard of anyone using an Intex SWG with an Intex pump to have the SWG working while the main pump is off, although Intex does make a SWG/pump combo unit. The electrolysis should be happening almost instantaneously inside the cell, plus the pumps aren't pumping the water all that fast, so I don't think you could pump the water faster than the cell could make the chlorine.

The Intex units have a flow sensor built in to detect low/no flow, so you'll want to have the unit come on after your pump starts up, not a little bit beforehand. Actually, I've found I have to run my SWG much less than I have to run the pump. Now that I've gone to a two-speed pump and run it on low pretty much 24x7, I'll set up the SWG to come on for three or four hours in the morning. If I still had my single speed pump, I had it going 12 hours a day (6am - 6pm), so I set the SWG to come on around 7am and run till about 11am, iirc. That maintained my FC perfectly.
 

Strannik

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 24, 2007
874
Brisbane, Australia
pool4me said:
I never thought that it was even possible to get the levels that high (to shock) like you mention. Do people actually do that? It would seem that you'd really be taking a toll on the cell with that type of activity... Like you mention.

sure it's possible
if you buy SWG which is sized appropriately for that
but it would probably be a waste of money :)
 

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