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Thread: St. Paul Pool Uses Moss To Reduce Chlorine Use

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    Join Date
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    St. Paul Pool Uses Moss To Reduce Chlorine Use

    "At the pools, sterilized moss is placed in containers, and water is allowed to flow slowly through it. Knighton said the moss acts as a filter, removing heavy metals such as iron, and as a conditioner, limiting the growth of bacteria, algae, mold and fungus. He said the pH level, or alkalinity, of the water also is more stable."


    http://wcco.com/local/poll.moss.chlorine.2.1168712.html

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    Re: St. Paul Pool Uses Moss To Reduce Chlorine Use

    sounds like a refugium. I'm surprised the chlorine does not kill the moss.

    dave
    15,500 gal, inground gunite pool with 7 ft spa, 2 speed pump 2hp/.33hp, 3/4 hp booster pump, Intermatic P1353 timer, AutoPilot SC-48, Sand filter with ZeoBest, Heater, that I never use . . .

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    Re: St. Paul Pool Uses Moss To Reduce Chlorine Use

    Here is a link to the company website. I am interested in how you would measure it's effectiveness and how you know when to replace the "pads". They give you a time when they should be replaced but it should be based on run time and usage I would think, not just time in days. I guess I just am so used to testing in order to know when to add something to my pool I would be more comfortable with a system that you could measure the effectiveness in a quantitative way.

    http://www.cwsnaturally.com/pool/
    18K gallon IG pool and separate 1200 Gallon IG spa - Both have: Diamond Brite Plaster- Hayward DE Filter -Propane heater- renovated 8/2008

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    Re: St. Paul Pool Uses Moss To Reduce Chlorine Use

    The more I read about this the more interesting it sounds. I would love to hear some feedback from users here if anyone knows about this. Maybe I will try it next year.
    18K gallon IG pool and separate 1200 Gallon IG spa - Both have: Diamond Brite Plaster- Hayward DE Filter -Propane heater- renovated 8/2008

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    spishex's Avatar
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    Re: St. Paul Pool Uses Moss To Reduce Chlorine Use

    This is what you get when you click the "Science" tab.

    Moss: Nature’s secret weapon

    Years of testing have proven that a specific variety of moss has the ability to buffer and filter water. Studies show that using moss reduces the chemicals needed to maintain acceptable water chemistry by as much as 90%.
    Why It Works:

    Understanding Biofilm

    Biofilm is nature’s way to provide bacteria with a suitable environment in which to proliferate, communicate, and survive, especially in harsh environments. Resistant to typical concentrations of most spa and pool chemicals, adding more and more chemicals to control bacteria with the protective biofilm isn’t the only answer.

    Only when bacteria are released from biofilm’s protective shield are free-floating, unprotected planktonic bacteria vulnerable to deadly chemicals and sanitizers.
    Why Moss works

    Studies show that moss demonstrates a number of unique characteristics that buffer and filter water. Moss releases conditioning substances and actively removes ions from water.

    Consequently, using moss requires fewer chemicals less often to maintain water chemistry.
    Biofilm vs. Chemicals:
    Biofilm wins

    Research shows that typical concentrations of chemicals used to maintain water chemistry in pools and spas actually bind to the surface of biofilm decreasing their effectiveness. Contrary to what one might expect, adding more chemicals in an attempt to control bacteria only creates an even more unmanageable and uncomfortable chemical soup.
    And as with all non-sanitizing "natural" pool systems:
    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the United States requires that a sanitizer with bacteria killing properties be used in a residential pool or spa. The combination of the SpaNaturally or PoolNaturally systems and small amounts of an EPA approved sanitizer provides the highest quality of water while reducing or eliminating undesirable side effects. We recommend maintaining a sanitizer reading on a test strip of 1-2 parts per million.
    All for only $100/month + startup.

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    mickey4paws's Avatar
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    Re: St. Paul Pool Uses Moss To Reduce Chlorine Use

    We have a maple tree that has moss growing on it. Every time it would rain, we'd get moss in the pool and would subsequently end up with algae. Guess it wasn't the right kind of moss?
    IG 12' x 39' - 20k Gallons - Vinyl Lined - StaRite Cristal-Flo II 26" Sand Filter - Hayward SuperPump 1 hp - Dolphin Dynamic autocleaner - Lochinvar Energyrite gas heater - Aqua Rite SWCG T-15 - TF100 Test Kit - Skimlite Duallly 9016 pole (great pole)

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    Re: St. Paul Pool Uses Moss To Reduce Chlorine Use

    OK, I'm wading in, kinda feels like the deep end to me though.

    I am familiar with the use of Almond tree leaves in discus tanks, as well as peat moss or oak leaves, to "buffer and remove ions" from water. This works from the addition of tannins to the water, the absorbtion of some hard water ions, and there is some filtration that occurs when the bioflim gets established on the surfaces. That biofilm is also housed in the filter of a fish tank, where it works to remove ammonia, nitrates, and nitrites.

    If the biofilm is working well, you can have a fish tank that is algae free, inspite of the constant addition of fertilizers in the form of fish food and waste. So, it appears to me that they are just suggesting that if you add a biological filter to your pool you will have a cleaner pool.

    What I cannot follow, though is the part about only bacteria free floating being subject to chemical control "Only when bacteria are released from biofilm’s protective shield are free-floating, unprotected planktonic bacteria vulnerable to deadly chemicals and sanitizers." Because if you are adding moss into the pool system, you are providing a home for that protective biofilm where it can be protected from chemicals.

    Now, some bacteria are "good" in that they can process ammonia and nitrogen compounds and remove them, but others can be "bad" and transmit staph and colds and other disease. I think in the pool, where we all swim together, I'd rather NOT have a biofilm in residence to hold this stuff.

    Now the question in my mind, is do we really have a biofilm in residence in our pools? When I clean my cart I see a thin brown goo that is just like what I cleaned from my fish tank filter. So, I will guess that my filter, inspite of the chlorine, still is able to process something biologically. maybe I am wrong, maybe it is just body oils and lotions.

    I cannot say whether biological filtration is good or bad or whether more biological filtration is needed in my pool.

    In fish ponds, we often use a slow running waterfall to act as a filter. The waterfall is allowed to get covered in algae, which is what is cleaning the water of ammonia and associated products of fish waste and plant decay. Sometimes this green covered waterfall is enough to keep a pond clear. Not sure I'd swim in it a lot, but it can have clear water most of the year. At least until the temperature drops and the biofilm goes into hibernation.

    I have swum if spring fed public swimming pools, alongside fish, and I suppose that we were relying on the volume of water passing though to carry off any disease issues from other bathers in the water.

    But, in a pool where the water is not frequently changed out, and there are bathers there that may have runny noses or cut feet or whatever, I really think that less biofilters full of bacteria will be better than more of them.



    Quote Originally Posted by spishex
    This is what you get when you click the "Science" tab.

    Moss: Nature’s secret weapon

    Years of testing have proven that a specific variety of moss has the ability to buffer and filter water. Studies show that using moss reduces the chemicals needed to maintain acceptable water chemistry by as much as 90%.
    Why It Works:

    Understanding Biofilm

    Biofilm is nature’s way to provide bacteria with a suitable environment in which to proliferate, communicate, and survive, especially in harsh environments. Resistant to typical concentrations of most spa and pool chemicals, adding more and more chemicals to control bacteria with the protective biofilm isn’t the only answer.

    Only when bacteria are released from biofilm’s protective shield are free-floating, unprotected planktonic bacteria vulnerable to deadly chemicals and sanitizers.
    Why Moss works

    Studies show that moss demonstrates a number of unique characteristics that buffer and filter water. Moss releases conditioning substances and actively removes ions from water.

    Consequently, using moss requires fewer chemicals less often to maintain water chemistry.
    Biofilm vs. Chemicals:
    Biofilm wins

    Research shows that typical concentrations of chemicals used to maintain water chemistry in pools and spas actually bind to the surface of biofilm decreasing their effectiveness. Contrary to what one might expect, adding more chemicals in an attempt to control bacteria only creates an even more unmanageable and uncomfortable chemical soup.
    And as with all non-sanitizing "natural" pool systems:
    [quote:ufyvan29]The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the United States requires that a sanitizer with bacteria killing properties be used in a residential pool or spa. The combination of the SpaNaturally or PoolNaturally systems and small amounts of an EPA approved sanitizer provides the highest quality of water while reducing or eliminating undesirable side effects. We recommend maintaining a sanitizer reading on a test strip of 1-2 parts per million.
    All for only $100/month + startup.[/quote:ufyvan29]
    23,000 gallon in ground pool with rock waterfall and spillover spa, Aqualink control system, Polaris 380 cleaner, Purex Triton Clean&Clear Plus cartridge filter. Located in The Woodlands, Texas.

    Pool owner since Nov 2008, Trouble Free since April 2009. Happy to help when I can.

  8. Back To Top    #8

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    Re: St. Paul Pool Uses Moss To Reduce Chlorine Use

    Found this interesting from the perspective of an aquarium owner.

    The majority of information is given in the patent application. In summary after reading it it says the benefits of this system are:

    1. The Moss produces a substance which is baceriostatic (not bacteriocidal).
    2. It also claims to be anti-fungal but doesn't go into testing the efficacy of this.
    3. The processing of the moss with acid washing and pH neutralizing leads to a filtration media amenable to ion exchange function (i.e. it absorbs iron and some calcium). The absorption of the iron could help explain (if true) reduced chlorine demand to prevent algae growth.

    It is kind of pricey.....for the latest new fangled unproven thing.
    If anyone tries it, give us some feedback here.

    Lee
    IG 24k plaster with overflow spa. Goldline PS-8 SWG. Tristar 0.75 HP filter pump, Polaris 280, large cartridge filter, 400k BTU NG Max-E-Therm HD, SR Smith Turbo Twister, Life Saver pool fence, ORP managed.

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    Sarnia, Ontario Canada
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    Re: St. Paul Pool Uses Moss To Reduce Chlorine Use

    no one has tried this?
    20x47' double roman vinyl liner pool. Pentair EasyTouch 8PSC-IC40, 011018 Pentair IntelliFlo, Pentair Clean & Clear Plus Filter CCP420, Pentair 120V IntelliBrite LED, Cleardeck indeck solar reel, 530 sq' solar system Polaris 9300xi robot, Interfab Turbotwister slide, S.R. Smith T7 diving board, deck jets vinyl-liner-pool-build-in-ontario-canada-new-pictures-t30213.html

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