Troubleshooting Hayward H200FDP Heater

Neemer

Gold Supporter
Oct 10, 2017
178
Mid-Atlantic
I’m stumped. I’m ready to call in a tech, but wanted to run this by the group first in case I’m overlooking something.

I’ve not been able to get the heater to fire this season, getting the infamous IF error. I’ve tested everything I can. The gas valve is good, I can see an orange glow in the combustion chamber from the igniter, I pulled the flame sensor and cleaned it (it wasn’t dirty, and the porcelain is intact). The gas pressure at the valve inlet is within spec. The manifold pressure appears good as well, although the valve shuts off before the pressure climbs completely into spec range.

As I see it, the only possibilities are the ignition control board and flame sensor. The ignition sequence occurs as it should, but there just isn’t any flame occurring apparently. Have I overlooked anything?
 

danpik

TFP Guide
Jun 4, 2012
1,712
western NY
The flame sensor does not come into play until the burners have lit...kind of. Have you checked the orifices to ensure they are clear? If the igniter is lighting, then the controller is working. The way the sequence works is this.

Call for heat
Blower fan on.
proving switch closes.
Igniter on.
Gas valve opens
Flame sensor "sees" fire (looks for this ~5 seconds after gas valve opens)
Burner stays lit

If the flame sensor does not "see" the fire, then the system shuts down
 

danpik

TFP Guide
Jun 4, 2012
1,712
western NY
When the as valve opens, there should be a click. Some are not very loud. Check for 24 volts at the valve when it is signaled to open with a volt meter.
 

Neemer

Gold Supporter
Oct 10, 2017
178
Mid-Atlantic
My tests of the inlet and manifold gas pressures indicate the valve is opening as it should. I’m also getting 24v at the terminals. It seems to open long enough to allow gas to begin entering the chamber, but since it doesn’t fire off, the valve immediately shuts down, which I assume is due to the flame sensor not finding fire.

Like I said, stumped.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
14,975
Remove and inspect Gas Orifices and Burners for blockage (Spider webs etc) if that's something you feel comfortable doing.
 

CPS Reno

In The Industry
Feb 6, 2019
19
Reno, NV
Sounds like you've covered your bases pretty well. If you get to the point of replacing the ICB (ignition control board), don't be afraid to change them yourself. It's pretty much "plug and play". But, our Hayward rep and our past experience tell us to change ALL 3 boards out if you need to change the ICB. These heaters are great, but the boards can give each other problems and one board can even cause another board to fail. Just my two cents.
 
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danpik

TFP Guide
Jun 4, 2012
1,712
western NY
Per James... Make sure the air doors and burner tubes are clear. If the gas valve is opening something is preventing the gas from getting to the igniter. At this point I would not throw any money at the electronics. It seems they are all working as they should.

Dan
 
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danpik

TFP Guide
Jun 4, 2012
1,712
western NY
Just a thought... do you smell gas when the valve opens? The gas valve should flow at least 5 seconds before the flame sense circuit shuts it down.

Dan
 
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Neemer

Gold Supporter
Oct 10, 2017
178
Mid-Atlantic
Sounds like you've covered your bases pretty well. If you get to the point of replacing the ICB (ignition control board), don't be afraid to change them yourself. It's pretty much "plug and play". But, our Hayward rep and our past experience tell us to change ALL 3 boards out if you need to change the ICB. These heaters are great, but the boards can give each other problems and one board can even cause another board to fail. Just my two cents.
I didn’t know that. Thank you!
 

markayash

Gold Supporter
Mar 21, 2016
430
Marrietta Ga
Interesting. I’m getting hopeful here.
Mine did the exact same thing and I just pulled the small burner panel off and blew compressed air in the tubes and around and it started working..I was starting to worry I had a board or sensor bad also. If you don't have a small air compressor maybe try a can of compressed air like you use to clean PC's?
 

Neemer

Gold Supporter
Oct 10, 2017
178
Mid-Atlantic
So here’s where I’m at now.

I removed the manifold and blew air into each of the tubes. Buttoned everything back up, tried it, no luck. Then I decided to tear into it and get the burner assembly out for a visual inspection. I’ve got it down to this:

106795

I’ve blown more air into the tubes and I noticed I’m not getting any blowback whatsoever to indicate a blockage anywhere.

If I continue further, I’m going to have buy a longer screwdriver to get at the three screws under the box shown here. Once I remove the screws from the perimeter of the box, I assume I should remove the two screws at each tube? At that point, will it simply slide out?
 

Neemer

Gold Supporter
Oct 10, 2017
178
Mid-Atlantic
Thanks for that, James. I thought they came out as a unit.

I pulled each out and they are not obstructed in any way. I’m beginning to think I have a fuel problem. My tank is at 50% which should be good I think. Maybe those pressure readings I’ve been taking aren’t what I think they are.

A bit frustrated. It seems it should be simple.
 

CPS Reno

In The Industry
Feb 6, 2019
19
Reno, NV
Maybe this will help, maybe not. We just had the same heater, but 250K, that wouldn't fire up. Replaced literally everything on it before we finally figure out the gas valve was bad (this happens when you have a new tech). But, after we swapped out the valve, the "old" inlet pressure of 10 wasn't enough to light with the new valve. We bumped the pressure up to 13 (the proper range is 10-13) and it has been working fine ever since. I guess the point is, sometimes you can have an issue small enough that won't allow the heater to work properly, even "within range". Try changing inlet pressure to the higher side of the range. I'M NOT SUGGESTING YOU GO OUTSIDE OF THAT RANGE!
 
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