STILL CHASING THE GHOST

joel0711

LifeTime Supporter
Apr 25, 2010
165
0
#1
I've been chasing down a small air leak but not luck--yet--
When first starting air appears to come in from under the basket lid.After being off for a period air appears to come from farther down the basket container. During running bubbles appear to be drawn in from lid. When off it takes 10 to 15 minutes for one bubble to come up (approx.size of quarter).I haven't lost prime in the last week but still have air in the basket each morning.
Here's what I've checked so far.
1. new gasket on basket lid (I have another gasket to try if anyone thinks the last one may be bad,,how do I tell??)
2. unhooked liquidator ball gauge but bubbles continued to appeared.Water is still in gauge in the mornig after pump off all night.

3. Pinched hose between liquidator and pump and held to see if bubbles would stop,they didnt. 4.covered all pipe connections with tape to see if one of them was possibly leaking, no luck
5.Checked wier door for smooth operation, it moves without effort
From my very limited experience the problem should be the lid gaket or lid itself. It is 4 years old. Should I go ahead and change the gasket once again just to be sure of it?? I see no cracks in the lid. There is absolutely no water leaks in the system. Pad is dry as my yard, we're having a real dry spell at the moment! Any directions could sure be used,I've 'bout ran out of ideas,even though I'm sure it's something small and simple...
 

joel0711

LifeTime Supporter
Apr 25, 2010
165
0
#3
Using one drain plug for liquidator-- I have teflon tape on threads(couple wraps) and put an 0 ring on it also,,same for the one drain plug left in. I put tape around it to see if that helped but it didnt, i can change it though,got a few spares.
 

mikeginder

Well-known member
May 23, 2011
133
0
#4
If this helps mine was not holding the water in the basket after shut off. I tightened my ring on top of the sand filter. that solved it
 

Ohm_Boy

TFP Expert
May 1, 2007
1,344
0
Orlando, FL
#6
Sometimes, suction leaks can be found using running water from a garden hose. Let the water flow onto suspected areas, and watch the bubbles. If the bubbles stop, you're flooding the leaking area with water.