Liner pool with potential structural problems

SAL96

New member
Jun 1, 2020
4
Orlando
Thanks. My question is in regard to the structural integrity of the pool. I'm looking for the proper place to post my question. Maybe you can steer me in the correct direction. I haven't looked around TFP yet. In central Florida almost all pools are concrete, so I wasn't sure what I was looking at. An inspector is coming to look at the home Wednesday.

This pool is an in-ground vinyl liner pool. I think that the walls that support the liner are supposed to be attached together, but I'm not sure.

There is a crack in the pool deck and you can reach into the crack and push the back side of the liner. If this is the case, then the walls that support the liner are not attached.

If the home inspector says this is a problem, then I am going to ask the seller to fix it. Depending on the cost, they may not, and I will be out of the inspection money. Although it would make sense that the seller has to fix it to sell it (albeit not legally) or else it will go unsold.

Living in Florida, I have never seen a vinyl in-ground pool pool before because they are almost always concrete pools. Therefore, my question is two fold.

1. Am I misunderstanding how vinyl pools are constructed, and should the walls be connected without gaps?

2. If this is a problem, how much would it cost for the seller to fix it before closing? If it is too much, they may bail out.

Where should I ask this question?

Thank you!
SAL
 

Promee

Member
May 28, 2020
6
Patrick AFB, FL
I don’t have the answers to your questions, but offer a suggestion: hire a pool inspector, (plus mold inspection, plus roof).
We have bought 4 homes in Brevard county over the last 15 years, those inspections are worth every penny.
Your home inspector will do only what they are licensed to inspect — and will likely add several disclaimers re: roof/mold/pool/electrical.
A pool inspection can investigate your pump, pool structure integrity, and Gear up to check for cracks, leaks, and more. (Start with a bucket test.) They are about the same cost as an entire home inspection.

we bought this house in January. It took us a year to get into a house *because* we did inspections. Everything found in our pool inspection is holding true — and here we are with a pool pump failure like clockwork. it’s a manageable issue, but problems with the cracks/foundation/leaks would’ve killed the deal for us. He estimated $20-40k to basically rebuild if there had been any of those major issues.
 

SAL96

New member
Jun 1, 2020
4
Orlando
We have a pool inspector coming Wednesday. We called several, and they all said (including this one) that they do not inspect the structural integrity of the pool. I don't know if they say that for liability in case they cannot observe the actual structural integrity, or if it is something that they do not inspect.
Thank you!