Burning eyes

colon001

Active member
Sep 18, 2016
27
Tampa, FL
Help, I need this to be taken care or my wife will get a pool service :)

I had algae and followed the instructions to SLAM my pool. Now the water is crystal clear. After a few days we finally get back in the pool. However eyes are burning and the smell of chlorine is very strong.

Tested the water and below are the results:

FC: 22.5
CC: 0
TA: 110
Ph: 7.6
CA: 320
CYA: 100

I know the CYA is high but I inherited the pool from a heavy user of tabs...so obviously my FC level had to compensate. But maybe I pulled the trigger too soon to get in given that I'm at 22.5??

Please help! Thanks
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
17,224
Tucson, AZ
You can't accurately measure your pH when your FC is above 10ppm. Your pH could be very low since high FC skews pH to higher values.

Let your FC come down below 10ppm then remeasure.
 

colon001

Active member
Sep 18, 2016
27
Tampa, FL
Thank you Joy! However before slamming Ph was at 7.6 too. Should I expect a big swing in Ph? Could FC be the cause? Not questioning your advise just trying to understand.


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JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
17,224
Tucson, AZ
Thank you Joy! However before slamming Ph was at 7.6 too. Should I expect a big swing in Ph? Could FC be the cause? Not questioning your advise just trying to understand.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Adding lots of bleach can temporarily raise pH due the excess lye in bleach (assuming you haven't added any acidic sources of chlorine, i.e. trichlor). Chlorine reactions are acidic in nature (they generate a proton, H+) and so will lower the pH over time. So your pH could be anywhere at the moment and the phenol red indicator will not be accurate when your FC is greater than 10ppm.

As for swimming in a highly chlorinated pool, while it is generally true that it is safe to swim up to shock levels of FC, it is not necessarily comfortable. Chlorine can interact with sweat and oils in your skin to form highly irritating CCs. This is why there is often a delayed smell when swimming - the water smells fine when you're in it but when you get out, your skin has that "gross" chlorine smell. The smell is the residual chlorine interacting with your skin to form CCs. I, personally, do not like swimming in a highly chlorinated swimming pool and, if I ever have to elevate my chlorine levels, I almost always keep my family out of the pool to avoid such issues. Others can swim in highly chlorinated pools and feel fine. It's a very person-speicifc response.