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Thread: Tile Cleaning Companies

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    Tile Cleaning Companies

    Is there any way to avoid using tile cleaning companies to clean calcium carbonate off the water line?

    Perhaps an acid gel of some kind?

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    Re: Tile Cleaning Companies

    Acid gel would adhere and might damage the grout.
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    Re: Tile Cleaning Companies

    Even if the acid gel were allowed to only temporarily adhere to the surface (i.e. wiping it off)?

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    Re: Tile Cleaning Companies

    Oh, so you're thinking of it as a stripper/smoother of the surface. If that's the approach you are thinking about, I would think that smoothing/buffing the surface (if possible) to have it be glossy/shiny and smooth would be the approach, but it still might not work. Certainly a surface that is rough is more likely to get scale to develop just because of the nature of the surface, but even a smooth surface can have evaporation leave a residue. You'd almost need some sort of teflon-like surface that not only inhibited scale formation but also would have any residue from evaporation "slide off" along with the water -- that is, a very hydrophobic surface.

    Aren't there sprays or liquids one can put onto some materials that make them very hydrophobic -- some sealants that have water bead up after application? Maybe something like that on the tile might work best, but you need to be careful that it doesn't change the appearance of the tile in a way the customer doesn't want.
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    Re: Tile Cleaning Companies

    Quote Originally Posted by chem geek View Post
    Oh, so you're thinking of it as a stripper/smoother of the surface. If that's the approach you are thinking about, I would think that smoothing/buffing the surface (if possible) to have it be glossy/shiny and smooth would be the approach, but it still might not work. Certainly a surface that is rough is more likely to get scale to develop just because of the nature of the surface, but even a smooth surface can have evaporation leave a residue. You'd almost need some sort of teflon-like surface that not only inhibited scale formation but also would have any residue from evaporation "slide off" along with the water -- that is, a very hydrophobic surface.

    Aren't there sprays or liquids one can put onto some materials that make them very hydrophobic -- some sealants that have water bead up after application? Maybe something like that on the tile might work best, but you need to be careful that it doesn't change the appearance of the tile in a way the customer doesn't want.
    Yes, I remember a tile cleaning company put a very hydrophobic chemical on the tiles that surrounded an elevated island spa. The water flowing down formed a V shape. The pool builder was supposedly furious. Without the chemical, the water would cover the whole tile all the way down.

    Smoothing and buffing will only work for certain surfaces. This will not work for rocks, etc.

    I thought I heard of acid gels that are applied, and take away the solids at the water line when the chemical is wiped away.

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    Re: Tile Cleaning Companies

    Yes an acid would help to dissolve calcium carbonate but of course there's a balance in trying not to damage the surface underneath.
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    Re: Tile Cleaning Companies

    I did some research on the gel products.

    It seems they're much more time consuming than blasting off the calcium carbonate.

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