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Thread: PVC Leak

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    TizMe's Avatar
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    PVC Leak

    OK ... I think we got the leak sealed at the return side of the pump. But now there is a leak further along the PVC pipe going to the return jet. My question is can i put glue around where the connection was made and will it seal it or should i put some silicone around the area ? or do i need to cut the pipe out and start over again ?
    Les
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    I wouldn't use glue...if you want to use an external patch some pool putty is a better solution. It's a two part epoxy you can find at most pool stores.
    21' Leslies Beachland Ag Pool, 10,000 gallons, professionally installed (best money I ever spent) Hayward 16" sand filter w/Pentair two speed pump Fafco 4x20 solar heater,Aqua Trol RJ. Borates added. Hard plumbed.

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    TizMe's Avatar
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    Hey Aquaman,

    Do I put this putty around the joint(s) at the leak or do I have to take it apart and start over again ?This has become a very frustrating event ....
    Les
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    Tiz,

    I'm pretty sure aquaman was offering that advice because he assumed you didn't want to remake the joint. I would cut the pipe completely and put in a new section. You'll need another foot or so of pipe and two slip joints but you'll be much happier with that permanent fix.

    If you're not comfortable working with PVC glue, HD/Lowe's carries a slip-on connector that will reconnect the two ends without any glue. I really don't like them very much....pvc glue is far more permanent and more professional looking, but that option is there if you need it.

    If you use the two-part epoxy, get that joint absolutely dry before you apply it.
    Dave S. - Forum owner
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    i would cut out the bad and use new pipe with glue and primer
    if not i would dig it all out and call a local pool company to come and fix it sould be just a service stop and parts

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    Not to hi-jack the OP's thread, but what is the best way to 'splice' in new PVC/fittings when something like this happens? The big (pool plumbing size) PVC is so rigid, it really makes it tough to do so. Not like working with sprinkler system PVC that can easily flex.
    WetEdge Satin Matrix, 16K gallon, Pentair NSP-60 DE filter, Pac Fab Challenger, 2HP pump, BBB, Polaris 360

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    Samm,

    Like "All your Parts" said, it's best to cut enough pvc out of the system to allow for some "give" so you can slip a coupler over the old to the new and glue it like it should be.

    Those "splice" couplers that tighten onto the existing pipe with rubber collars are convenient but I've had mixed success with them.

    Lastly, you can cut out the old and install new using pvc unions. They look nice and allow you to simply unscrew the pipe should you ever need to, but that's the most expensive and time consuming method.
    Dave S. - Forum owner
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    they do make a flexable PVC (but it can not be used in all cases)

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    TizMe's Avatar
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    Someone mentioned flexable PVC at work today... does it need to be glued as well and where can you get it from ?
    Les
    Don't have a pool right now. Just sharing what I have learned over the years!
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    I would stay away from flex pvc. I have found it tends to fail (collapses on itself) or kinks. Regular schedule 40 pvc is your best bet and definitely use a union. It will make your life much easier. IF you do use flex pvc- you need a specific type of glue specially made for flexible pvc. I think the type of coupling the other posts have mentioned is a mission coupling. It basically is a piece of radiator hose the is attached to each of the pvc with two steel clamps that tighten down with a screwdriver. I have had a good amount of success with these. However, I would recommend cutting the bad piece out and replacing with sched 40 pvc, a regular slip coupling and a union (primed and glued of course).

  11. Back To Top    #11
    Just to clarify my comment -- your best option is to cut out the area with the leak and replumb it -- I assumed by your post that you didn't want to do that.

    If you don't want to do replumb then in my opinion pool putty is the simplest and most effective option. I would stay away from the "hose repair" type connections and there is no advantage to using flex PVC.
    21' Leslies Beachland Ag Pool, 10,000 gallons, professionally installed (best money I ever spent) Hayward 16" sand filter w/Pentair two speed pump Fafco 4x20 solar heater,Aqua Trol RJ. Borates added. Hard plumbed.

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    flex pvc is safe and easy it will not collapse and you use a reg. coupling (sch. 40) and glue
    the advantage of this is a little bend to make it easier to put in your piece of pipe in for the repair if this underground do not use a union just 2 couplings a piece of pipe and glue and primer

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    sammm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by all your parts
    if this underground do not use a union just 2 couplings a piece of pipe and glue and primer
    How? How can you slip on the 2nd coupler and/or pipe if you can't 'flex' the existing pipe?
    WetEdge Satin Matrix, 16K gallon, Pentair NSP-60 DE filter, Pac Fab Challenger, 2HP pump, BBB, Polaris 360

  14. Back To Top    #14
    here is what to do
    1) dig out a nice area to work with (that will make the easier on you) all around the pipe
    2) cut out about 2 feet of the pipe (including the leaking piece)
    3) glue 2 coupling to each side of the cut pipe
    4) cut a piece of the flex pvc pipe (found at most pool stores) enough to fit to each side
    5) put primer and glue to each side of pipe and both couplings
    6) bend pipe in middle and insert into both sides (it will bend enough to get it in)
    i did not mention that you should block off pipes so you are not working under water
    this was a quick version if you need more please feel free to pm me
    paul

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    Ohm_Boy's Avatar
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    I have seen PVC couplings that were called 'no-stop' or 'repair' couplings, which are like any normal PVC pipe coupling, except that there is no ridge (or 'stop') in the middle, so it can slip completely over a pipe.
    Once you cut out a bad section of pipe, these can be slipped over the ends that are left. Then you can insert a replacement section of pipe, and slide the couplings into place on the repair section.
    My thought is to mark the pipes where the coupling should go so that once the glue is down, you don't have to guess how far to slide the couplings.
    This one http://www.hardwareandtools.com/invt/6284731 is called out as a DWV application, but it's schedule 40 and should work fine on pool applications.
    [center:1kpalu48]Helpful Links: Pool School | CYA/Chlorine Chart | Pool Calculator[/center:1kpalu48]

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    Ok,the people who came and changed our liner came back yesterday and supposedly '''fixed" the leaks. Cant turn on filter until after 2pm ,so we shall see. He did I notice replaced the PVC with flex and said thats what they use now ..

    Do I need to retest before I start adding my chemicals since my test is over a week old and just filled the pool?
    Les
    Don't have a pool right now. Just sharing what I have learned over the years!
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    You should retest at least chlorine and PH and might as well test TA again. There isn't much point in testing CYA that soon unless there is some reason you expect it to have changed.
    19K gal, vinyl, 1/2 HP WhisperFlo pump, 200 sqft cartridge filter, AutoPilot Digital SWG, Dolphin Dynamic cleaning robot
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