Would like to properly hookup my salt controller. (Rewire)

nxoone

Member
May 30, 2018
7
Jacksonville Beach
I have a Hayward salt system and a pentair intellipro 2vst pump

I had the VS pump put in a year ago. The installer took the stops of the mechanical timer, which leaves the salt system on all the time.

I'm on my third salt cell as of this week (the first died within a few days of buying the house) within the last 12 months. Ive read it's best to shut off the controller when the pump is off.

I would like to bypass the mechanical timer that both are currently connected to. What is the best way to do that? Connect the pump to the line terminals, or wire directly to the line terminals with wire nuts and have a short lead leading back to the line on the timer?

(Recap: pump will have power all the time, and salt system will be switched by the mechanical timer).

Thanks in advance.
 

bobandsherry

Bronze Supporter
Apr 20, 2016
388
Riverview, FL
With VS pump just let it run 24 hours too, that's what I do. Ensures that pump and SWG don't get out of sync due to power outage when I'm away or traveling. I set to run higher speed for several hours during the day for cleaning then set to slow speed for other hours. Set low speed at whatever your flow sensor needs so that it doesn't get tripped. I estimate that cost me about $5 a month more but worth it to ensure the two never get out of sync.

My understanding is its better on the motor to let it continually run vs the spikes that occur with powering it on. Not sure if that's correct, but people smater than me passed that along. [emoji3]
 

rmturner54

Well-known member
Jul 6, 2013
555
Waxahachie, Tx.
Just a question, not criticizing. Why not use the mech timer to run pmp and swg at same time? I dont know what brand swg u have but my aquarite panel is dual voltage. I have a vs pmp, mech timer wired just as i mentioned . The swg is only going to produce based on % output, which you already know.
Like I said just food for thought
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
21,236
Laughlin, NV
rmturner54 --- VS pumps are powered all the time. They have an internal timer/scheduler. You do not use a mechanical timer with them.
 

rmturner54

Well-known member
Jul 6, 2013
555
Waxahachie, Tx.
Thanks. I know they have an intetnal timer and can have power on them all the time Mine is turned completely off with no power via the diagram shown....per Hayward. Not trying to say who is right or wrong
rmturner54 --- VS pumps are powered all the time. They have an internal timer/scheduler. You do not use a mechanical timer with them.
 

mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
21,236
Laughlin, NV
Thanks. I know they have an intetnal timer and can have power on them all the time Mine is turned completely off with no power via the diagram shown....per Hayward. Not trying to say who is right or wrong
Then it is not properly wired.

- - - Updated - - -

The article you reference is for single or two speed motors.
 

rmturner54

Well-known member
Jul 6, 2013
555
Waxahachie, Tx.
My max flow vs is the basic model
SP2300VPS. It does not have the internal 24 hr clock option that you refer to. However that option is available on other models.
 

Killer95Stang

Well-known member
Aug 17, 2012
821
Sunny SoCal
Lets get this thread back on track... The fact of the matter is, the OP's Intellipro does have an internal timer which the OP is using to run the pump at a scheduled time. In this configuration, the pump needs to powered all the time. The salt cell on the other hand should only be powered and running when the pump is actually pushing water. Most salt cells have an internal flow sensor that keep it from producing chlorine when it doesn't sense flow, but that should only be used as a secondary safety device. If the salt cell flow sensor fails and continues to run when the pump is not pushing water, it could cause a build up of hydrogen gas which could explode. The OP should run the salt cell off the mechanical timer, so it matches the programmed timer of the intellipro pump. Probably best to have some type of overlap, where the SWG starts 15 minutes after the pump and shuts off 15 minutes before the pump shuts off.

I'm sure one of the TFP electomaniacs will be in shortly to help with the wiring.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
7,827
Northern NJ
I would like to bypass the mechanical timer that both are currently connected to. What is the best way to do that? Connect the pump to the line terminals, or wire directly to the line terminals with wire nuts and have a short lead leading back to the line on the timer?

(Recap: pump will have power all the time, and salt system will be switched by the mechanical timer).
You are asking about a very specific wiring technique that is best answered by a licensed electrican. I am not one.

My understanding is you don’t want to stack a few wires on a screw terminal. Especially high current draw devices like a pump. Therefore as you suggested an eletrician uses a pigtail attached to the screw terminal and then splices multiple wires to the pigtail using wirenuts.

Your basic plan is a good one to directly power your pump and use the timer to swicth the SWG. You must coordinate the on/off settings between the pump controller and the mechanical timer or you can still end up with the SWG powered and the pump off. Some VS pump controllers have a relay to connect the SWG to so that the VS pump controller can turn on and off both. I guess yours does not.
 

bobandsherry

Bronze Supporter
Apr 20, 2016
388
Riverview, FL
Lets get this thread back on track... The fact of the matter is, the OP's Intellipro does have an internal timer which the OP is using to run the pump at a scheduled time. In this configuration, the pump needs to powered all the time. The salt cell on the other hand should only be powered and running when the pump is actually pushing water. Most salt cells have an internal flow sensor that keep it from producing chlorine when it doesn't sense flow, but that should only be used as a secondary safety device. If the salt cell flow sensor fails and continues to run when the pump is not pushing water, it could cause a build up of hydrogen gas which could explode. The OP should run the salt cell off the mechanical timer, so it matches the programmed timer of the intellipro pump. Probably best to have some type of overlap, where the SWG starts 15 minutes after the pump and shuts off 15 minutes before the pump shuts off.

I'm sure one of the TFP electomaniacs will be in shortly to help with the wiring.
In ideal world, that works. But power outages can cause mechanical timer and pump timer to be out of sync. Flow switch is backup, but can be problematic if extended time away.
 

nxoone

Member
May 30, 2018
7
Jacksonville Beach
Thanks for all the good conversation.

I run my pump 7am to 11pm at 900rpm with about an hour of higher RPMs in there (2700 or so). It wouldn't be much more than an extra 20$ a year to run to pump the remaining 8 hours of the day at 900rpm. Or at least until I feel like rewiring/adding a relay.

Not to fire up another controversial topic but, ive seen a few people mention the VS pumps experience less wear when running 24/7 versus starting and stopping, so could be a small added bonus.
 

bobandsherry

Bronze Supporter
Apr 20, 2016
388
Riverview, FL
900 rpm is probably not enough to prevent the flow sensor from being triggered. But run your system and visually confirm. I'd guess 1300 may be lowest you can go, perhaps 1250.
 

Meadow

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2016
477
Temecula, CA
My understanding is its better on the motor to let it continually run vs the spikes that occur with powering it on. Not sure if that's correct, but people smater than me passed that along. [emoji3]
Not to fire up another controversial topic but, ive seen a few people mention the VS pumps experience less wear when running 24/7 versus starting and stopping, so could be a small added bonus.
Where are you guys getting this information? Can anyone please post a link to any references or scientific proof to support the above statements?
Anyone here keep their car engine running 24/7 in order to avoid wear and tear from starting and stopping the motor? :scratch: :scratch:
 

nxoone

Member
May 30, 2018
7
Jacksonville Beach
900 rpm is probably not enough to prevent the flow sensor from being triggered. But run your system and visually confirm. I'd guess 1300 may be lowest you can go, perhaps 1250.

It seems to have no problem generating chlorine at 900rpm. Over the past year I haven't seen it fail to do so .

I'm not saying it makes perfect logic to run it 24/7, just noticed it was mentioned a few times. I can see why ago ding daily dry starts would be a good thing but would it offset additional use...
 

rmturner54

Well-known member
Jul 6, 2013
555
Waxahachie, Tx.
I know this is off thread, but if anyone is intetested there are many articles and documentation on continous vs intetmittent duty operation. I for one will not get in to a deep technical discussion on it. You have to research ans decide what works best for you.