water tests look good, but small amount algae on walls

brianmac

Well-known member
May 26, 2012
45
Jackson/New Jersey
FC = 7
CC = 0
TA = 80
CYA = 85
PH = 7.3
TC = 90
SWG pool, 23,000 gals, AquaRite displaying 3500, using an Aquagenie skimming system

I have been noticing bands(3 inch x 1/2 foot sections) on the walls, just under the waterline. simple brush takes care of it. Water is sparkling, but is this normal?

Thanks!
Brian
 

duraleigh

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Apr 1, 2007
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Sebring, Florida
but is this normal?
Algae is never normal. Adequate chlorine and circulation of the pool water will eliminate all algae. Brushing more often may help end it.

Your numbers look very good but I suspect your chlorine has been lower in the past to allow that algae to get a foothold.
 

brianmac

Well-known member
May 26, 2012
45
Jackson/New Jersey
Dave,
Thanks for the response! I have a feeling that you are right about circulation. I have the pool running for 7 hours. I might try to add some more hours and see if that makes a difference. Is it better to run ,say 10 hours straight or two 6 hour runs?

Thanks again,
Brian
 

duraleigh

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I start in the Spring with 2 - 3 hour runs and now am at 3 - 3 hour runs. I will increase that to probably 12 hours total in the heat of the summer. Each pool is different and you have to figure out what suits your pool and schedule best.
 

BoDarville

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Jun 5, 2012
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DFW, Texas
brianmac:

Here's a Pool School article on determining pump run time: http://www.troublefreepool.com/pool-school/pump_run_time. This is the process I followed when I switched to BBB. As duraleigh stated, each pool is different. We could both follow the same process outlined in the article, but wind up with a different sweet spot in terms of pump run time. One thing I did while experimenting with the run times is keep a log dating each run time adjustment along with the total run time. Once you find your sweet spot, you may need to make adjustments based on seasonal factors and events such as a high bather load and/or heavy rain. Again, I keep a weekly log of current pump run time, test results, and water temperature (I'm a bit of a data junkie). This comes in handy each season as a good baseline.

Of course, whenever you are shocking, the pump should be run 24/7 during the shock process, pausing only to clean filters or backwash as needed (based on your filter PSI).