Updated CYA Test from Taylor Technologies - You could now test down to 5 ppm!

taylortechnologies

In The Industry
May 12, 2016
29
Sparks, MD
Please check out the updated instructions to the K-1720 CYA test from Taylor: Visual Determination, Cyanuric Acid, Turbidimetric, 0-500 ppm. These instructions allow you to test from 20-100 ppm and then down to 0-15 ppm. The update instructions are the 5096. We are very interested in you feedback. You could still test up to 500 ppm, but this does require the dilution discussed in the instructions. (I apologize for any confusion!)
 

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HermanTX

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Please check out the updated instructions to the K-1720 CYA test from Taylor: Visual Determination, Cyanuric Acid, Turbidimetric, 0-500 ppm. These instructions allow you to test from 0-100 ppm and then up to 500 ppm without dilution. The update instructions are the 5096. We are very interested in you feedback.
OK - well I am confused. You clearly state "...up to 500 ppm without dilution." But the instructions you attached states the following -
. "For CYA concentrations greater than 100 ppm, rinse and fill dilution vial (#6551) to 10 mL
mark with sample. Dilute to 50 mL with DI Water (R-0833) or CYA free water. Cap and invert
to mix. Proceed to step 1 using diluted sample. Multiply result by 5."

Isn't this dilution? Am I missing something?

PS - I do like the color guidance for less then 20ppm.
 

JJ_Tex

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Cool, we see a lot of people that have CYA of 100+ and have to dilute their sample.

If you are really looking for feedback on the instructions, my 2 cents are: The instructions are very focused on low CYA testing, which is a less common occurrence and less of a big deal to distinguish between between 5ppm and 10ppm. Either way you have to add roughly the same amount of CYA to get to your target.
I think t he high CYA would be the much more common scenario, so I would love to see step 8 better described. I think you also have to make it crystal clear that the color standard dots on the right side are only for those with low CYA. That seems like a good way for people with high CYA to get confused.
 
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taylortechnologies

In The Industry
May 12, 2016
29
Sparks, MD
That's what I get for working late! We were challenged by a chemical supplier to modify our kits to read lower CYA levels. The changes we made allow reading down to 5 ppm of CYA. You do need to dilute to read higher levels. I am so sorry for the error!
 

JoyfulNoise

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Please check out the updated instructions to the K-1720 CYA test from Taylor: Visual Determination, Cyanuric Acid, Turbidimetric, 0-500 ppm. These instructions allow you to test from 0-100 ppm and then up to 500 ppm without dilution. The update instructions are the 5096. We are very interested in you feedback.

Thanks for this update. Measuring very low CYA levels will be quite helpful for our hot tub members as they often struggle with keeping tabs on their CYA levels when using the Dichlor-then-Bleach sanitation method. Having a nice sample dilution tube is helpful as well.

Although I would say that $70 is a bit pricey. The kit comes with lots of reagent and lab ware but I think folks will struggle to pay the steep price for what might be a one-off need. Hard to say but I’m glad you’ve at least made this available.
 

taylortechnologies

In The Industry
May 12, 2016
29
Sparks, MD
You do not need to get the full kit. You could just modify your current kit with the new instruction, 5096. You could buy that through TFTestKits or on our website, whichever is easier for you.
 
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JamesW

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Mar 2, 2011
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Just do a reverse dilution by removing half of the water without removing half of the CYA. ;)
 

mgtfp

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Interesting. What's the background of the additional 2 minutes before doing the low CYA reading? Is the melamine reaction still proceeding and those extra deposits can't be ignored at low levels? Or is this just to give the already existing particles some time after handling the test tube to stop swirling around in the tube and create reproducible test conditions?
 

mgtfp

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Just do a reverse dilution by removing half of the water without removing half of the CYA. ;)

Would boiling down 50% of the water do the trick? Maybe TFP's homebrewing department also has some distilling equipment that could be used? ;)
 

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JamesW

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Mar 2, 2011
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Heat boiling might work but it might degrade the CYA.

I just use a vacuum to boil the water away.

For example, if you have 100 ml of water and boil for a while and you end up with 45 ml, you would run the test and then multiply the result by 0.45.

 
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mgtfp

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Heat boiling might work but it might degrade the CYA.

I just use a vacuum to boil the water away.

For example, if you have 100 ml of water and boil for a while and you end up with 45 ml, you would run the test and then multiply the result by 0.45.


Yeah, that's the way. Also much easier to instantaneously stop the boiling.
 
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