Typical time to swim after new pool is filled?

TulsaKevin

Platinum Supporter
Dec 9, 2014
66
0
Tulsa OK
#1
I have been trying to find a relative answer on the average time it takes to get the pool "swim" ready after it is filled. We are looking at getting a gunite pool and I know that they have to do some type of special post water fill process to help cure the plaster (not for sure if all gunite pools have plaster). Looking at the current build time of house, we should be finished by first of August. I am trying to figure out about when after that can we reasonably expect to have a pool safe to swim in, assuming we finish Aug 1 and fill the pool on the same day.

Getting very antsy with the build process, would love to have at least month or two in the pool, we usually are in the lake until Oct, lake temps get below 70, I figure a pool would be closely the same.
 

Patrick_B

LifeTime Supporter
TFP Expert
Jun 7, 2011
14,999
2
Midland TX
www.troublefreepool.com
#2
Welcome to the forum Kevin!

If your pool is full 8-1-15 and they do NOT do an acid start, you can swim soon. I suggest getting the startup done first acid or Bi-carb, and once done you can swim.

Our bunch swam pretty soon as you can see when we filled last April. The were slightly impatient. :lol: As of yet, we have seen no ill effects on the plaster....or the kids.





 

TulsaKevin

Platinum Supporter
Dec 9, 2014
66
0
Tulsa OK
#3
Love the photos, we have a few monkeys, including myself, who will be in swimsuits and in the pool as soon as the first drop of water hits the bottom of the pool. How long does the acid/bicarb treatment last.
 

smracing

Well-known member
Jun 1, 2011
182
0
42
Carlsbad, NM
#4
I would never swim that quickly after plaster. The first few days you can mar the finish by aggressive brushing. I waited until there was no more plaster dust when brushing (about 10 days). Our friends ruined their plaster swimming the day after filling. There were marks all over the shallow end that could not be removed even with acid. Read any of the plaster guides. They will tell you not to swim right away. It varies from a week to a month.
 

JasonLion

LifeTime Supporter
Platinum Supporter
TFP Expert
May 7, 2007
37,879
5
Silver Spring, MD
#7
You must be able to see the bottom of the pool clearly. The PH and FC levels need to be in range. And you should wait long enough that the plaster sets up enough so you won't damage it if you hit it sharply (which varies quite a bit from pool to pool, though is typically several hours as an absolute minimum).

Plaster dust can interfere with the visibility. An acid start prevents PH from being in range. Generally you want to raise FC slowly enough that it won't be in range for about three days. And so on.