Typical pool store conversation

rimshaker

Well-known member
Jul 15, 2007
64
Florida
Me: I'll be back later to buy some chlorine jugs.

Pool store: Why would you want to use liquid chlorine? It's only 5% strength.

Me: I thought you sold 10-12% strength.

Pool Store: They are when we get them, but by the time you get it home, it's down to about 5% strength.

Me: hmmmmm... really? That fast?

Pool Store: Better to use the higher 78% strength powder chlorine.

Me: You mean those dichlor and trichlor powder bags?

Pool Store: Yep, right over there.

Me: But I read somewhere that using those bags also increase the CYA in the pool. And my CYA is pretty high already.

Pool Store: How do you figure that?

Me: The powder breaks down into chlorine and leftover CYA.

Pool Store: No, that only applies to the tablets that you use for feeders and floaters.

Me: Aren't the powder and tablets the same chemically?

Pool Store: (confused pause) They may be similar, but the powder bags won't affect the CYA levels. If I were you, I'd get the stronger 78% powder instead of the 5% liquid, save you more time and money.

Me: okie dokie... thanx for the advice.
 

Rangeball

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
785
If the 78% bags were cal-hypo, they're right, no CYA. But of course that can potentially lead to it's own unique problems... :)
 

rimshaker

Well-known member
Jul 15, 2007
64
Florida
Only thing I wasn't sure of is the sodium hypo degradation. Can it really get down to 5% strength by the time a customer uses it at home?
 

tagprod

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 3, 2007
489
Tomball, Texas
Rangeball said:
If the 78% bags were cal-hypo, they're right, no CYA. But of course that can potentially lead to it's own unique problems... :)
I may have read this before, but what are the other problems?
 

Poseidon

Well-known member
May 24, 2007
148
Houston, Texas, USA
tagprod said:
Rangeball said:
If the 78% bags were cal-hypo, they're right, no CYA. But of course that can potentially lead to it's own unique problems... :)
I may have read this before, but what are the other problems?
Cal-hypo adds calcium, and calcium is only reduced via dilution. With high enough calcium, high enough TA and high enough pH, it can cause calcium precipitation which leads to cloudy water and scaling.
 

Attachments

JasonLion

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
May 7, 2007
37,880
Silver Spring, MD
10% and 12% bleach break down to half the initial concentration in perhaps three months at 90 degrees to a year at 75 degrees. If you and the pool store both store it somewhere dark and cool it will still be reasonably strong the whole season.
 

waste

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Mar 29, 2007
4,160
Coastalish 'down easter'
Just a little more on what Jason said, in direct sunlight the degradation is much more quickly - I've seen bottles of liquid chlor that are ~ clear after ~ a month of sitting out in direct sun