Trichlor and Liquid Chlorine experiment!?

CombatVet13

Silver Supporter
Apr 27, 2019
59
Mesa Arizona
Hey TFP friends. So something that has been on my mind that I’m implementing.

I’m having great success in my first month of pool ownership with the TFP method. Something to ponder and hear some feedback on. Here in AZ where a typical summer day is 105+ with all sun with very little cloud cover, I am noticing I lose 3-5 ppm in FC a day. Also notice that with the water evap and replenish my PH and TA start to rise, with CYA slowly disappearing.

My experiment consists of simply primarily chlorinating with Liquid Chlorine, but also floating 1-2 Trichlor pucks.

My hypothesis (I’m no scientist) but in doing this my theory is I slightly lose less FC thus not having to add as much bleach daily. Also my cya levels are stay right at 40 and my ph and TA is staying consistent as well.

My plan is simply floating two pucks for a week, then none for week, then repeat.

I’m only on the second rotation on doing this, but so far my levels are staying quite easy to maintain.


Thoughts!?
 

frogabog

Gold Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 16, 2010
2,472
Portland, Oregon
If you have a TF-100, you have plenty of CYA reagent to use to verify your hypothesis. Also, you can use Pool Math to calculate how much CYA they will add to compare with your testing.

Sounds like a decent plan to me. Pucks aren't evil till they've outlived their usefulness. Use them when you need them. Although, do note that 3-5ppm loss per day is fairly normal.
 
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CombatVet13

Silver Supporter
Apr 27, 2019
59
Mesa Arizona
I use the tf -100 test kit. And pool math.

I guess it’s my thought that leaving a puck or two floating every other week it keeps my ph n ta down and my cya level around 40. Also gives me a FC buffer. Just experimenting.
 

Rattus Suffocatus

Silver Supporter
Jun 5, 2019
216
Corona de Tucson, AZ
Yeah, it's been fricking hot here, and it's worse up by you. It's fine to do what you are doing as long as you monitor the situation. In a month or so you might want to curtail the pucks.

By the way thanks again for your pictures. My wife has second guessed the color choices and we always come back to your pictures and video to reassure her. :)
 

MyAZPool

Gold Supporter
Jul 3, 2018
964
Arizona
Hey Bruce,
With our brutal sun and our water temps in the high 80's to low 90's, it's guaranteed that your CYA will degrade. You should find that the CYA degradation will diminish as we move into our cooler times.
Just as an example, last year I added 8 oz of granular stabilizer in October. My CYA remained in the optimum range for a salt pool until I had to add stabilizer again in May. Since May, I have had to add a total of 78 oz of stabilizer on three separate occasions in order to keep my CYA on target. I know that I will have to add more stabilizer between now and October.

Have fun testing and experimenting. Over time and especially if you keep accurate logs, you should be able to nearly second guess how much stabilizer, MA and Chlorine you will need to add throughout our seasons (I use that word loosely) and confirm same with good testing and utilization of the pool math app.

But most importantly, have fun swimming in your clean and clear new pool!

Take care...
r..
 
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CombatVet13

Silver Supporter
Apr 27, 2019
59
Mesa Arizona
==========================================
Kimball’s Oasis
------------------------------------------
Build Type: Plaster
Volume: 15925 gallons
------------------------------------------
Latest Test Result Summary:
FC: 7.5 (9 minutes ago)
CC: 0.0 (9 minutes ago)
pH: 7.6 (9 minutes ago)
TA: 120 (9 minutes ago)
CH: 250 (9 minutes ago)
CYA: 40 (9 minutes ago)
TEMPERATURE: 85° (9 minutes ago)
CSI: 0.11 (9 minutes ago)
==========================================
 

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
32,377
Sebring, Florida
I think what OP is proposing here is replenishing lost CYA with pucks. Essentially, it doesn't work because CYA is ONLY lost because of splashout or draining. In other words, barring any major splashout, there is no loss of CYA unless it is intentionally drained.

That said, there is certainly some loss of CYA that happens over a swim season for a variety of reasons.......but I believe it is actually quite small in the majority of pools.

Water temp seems to be a factor but I don't get that chem geek or anyone is able to precisely define why this small CYA loss occurs......my take is there are multiple POSSIBLE factors but no ONE definitive factor.

For about 10 years my NC based pool (humid and hot) required about a 10 ppm boost just once each season to maintain a 40 ppm CYA level.
 

Tonic1080

Member
May 5, 2019
9
Scottsdale, AZ
You sir read my mind! I have been "discussing with Professor Google" on this very topic and I'm glad I found people with the same thoughts.

SE California (Palm Springs), AZ, NM, East/South Texas all have a more unique issue in the US of guaranteed very high temperatures and very intense daily sun/UV.
I'm curious if there is any specific known things that people in our environment should consider? The feedback people gave that stabilizer degrades faster in high heat is extremely helpful and something I have also personally observed in AZ!

Like: what exact impact on chlorine burn-off does this make....which makes me think....is if CYA 40 is realistic/appropriate for Phoenix area? Should it be a little higher out here knowing burn-off is a bigger issue?
I feel like I am adding 2 gal of LC twice a week (at least) at ideal balance level and that doesn't feel "balanced"/"trouble-free". :D

It seems like out here it was easier to maintain the balance at CYA 80 and much more consistent that I only needed to treat it once a week. I've since been following TFP recommendations on levels but it's not uncommon to hear people say "you need more stabilizer out here".

I've been considering your same idea, either via tablets or granular shock but curious on the exact science behind how much how frequently.
 

CombatVet13

Silver Supporter
Apr 27, 2019
59
Mesa Arizona
You should be adding chlorine to your pool daily. A roller coaster of FC levels, most likely going below minimum, is not a trouble free way to manage a pool.

In the desert, a SWCG or liquid chlorine dispensing system is your friend.
Liquid Chlorine dispenser caught my intention?

Where could one find that!?

I have two week long vacations coming up.
In September and in October.
 

kimkats

Mod Squad
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2012
40,406
Tallahassee, FL
I tried to just use pucks for two weeks while I was dealing with my husband's ankle replacement. It did not go so well (using the pucks that is the ankle replacement went great). Now for a full disclosure I did not even look at my pool or do anything to it during that time. No testing, no brushing, no anything. When I was able to think about the pool I had almost no FC (.5) and a slight cloudiness to the water and some green dust on the walls. Brushed the pool, did a SLAM and it was all good again in 3 days.

Because of that I will be getting a SWG soon. The wallet has to recover from the cost of the surgery.
 

jmikeb

Gold Supporter
Aug 4, 2017
273
stillwater oklahoma
I think what OP is proposing here is replenishing lost CYA with pucks. Essentially, it doesn't work because CYA is ONLY lost because of splashout or draining. In other words, barring any major splashout, there is no loss of CYA unless it is intentionally drained.

That said, there is certainly some loss of CYA that happens over a swim season for a variety of reasons.......but I believe it is actually quite small in the majority of pools.

Water temp seems to be a factor but I don't get that chem geek or anyone is able to precisely define why this small CYA loss occurs......my take is there are multiple POSSIBLE factors but no ONE definitive factor.

For about 10 years my NC based pool (humid and hot) required about a 10 ppm boost just once each season to maintain a 40 ppm CYA level.
i’m sure i lose cya from hot weather.