To replace the whole pool or not - that is the question

Fronzizzle

Well-known member
Jun 29, 2017
84
Augusta Township, Michigan
Hello all,

I couldn't decide if this should be in Above Ground Pools or here in Under Construction, so I flipped a coin & here won. If it's wrong, sorry!

Some quick background: we bought our house in 2016, it was built in 2000 and I think the pool and deck were installed shortly after. The pool itself is (I believe) an Ester Williams, 18' x 33' oval, 48" walls. There is a picture attached of our current setup.

Because of the condition of the entire deck (especially the railings), we have decided some - or a lot - of renovation is needed. Right now, everything is on the table but I thought that a good place to start would be to determine if the existing pool should be replaced.

The liner is definitely shot, though it's only 4+ years old. At least, that's supposed to be the age, we were told it was replaced just before we moved in. The top of the liner is sagging in one small section, but the entire thing is bleached and/or stained. There are also two unused light lenses, one of which is leaking through a crack, so before a new liner was put in, the lights would have to be removed and some sort of patch put in. All of the top rails look bad, too - they are bent, twisted, rusting in some areas, etc. The bottom is also incredibly lumpy with a lot of divots, so I'd want to put the foam down, too.

I got a rough quote for the liner (parts and labor) of $1,400. I'm sure the top rails and things could be replaced, too. My biggest issue is that I think one side of the pool is sinking. If you look at the picture, you can see what I'll call the lower right corner is actually below the deck now. As far as I can tell, there are no cement footings (maybe that's normal?), but rather something that looks like heavy-duty patio stones under each support, and most are broken (see the second picture).

So...my gut tells me that if we are going to do some renovating anyway, I should plan on replacing the pool, too. However, that may be an unnecessary expense; if it cost $2,000 to fix but $8,000 to replace, then maybe it's not worth it.
 

zea3

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2009
12,631
Houston, Texas
You photos are not attached. Esther Williams are expensive pools. It may be worth repairing. Most AGPs are installed with thick pavers to support the uprights. If the pavers are cracked, there maybe something going on under the pool causing things to shift. My neighbor had a couple of trees removed and a few years later after the roots rotted away the ground in that area sank, and I ended up with an unlevel pool.

Try attaching the photos again. Use the little "picture" symbol next to the camera symbol to attach photos.
 

Fronzizzle

Well-known member
Jun 29, 2017
84
Augusta Township, Michigan
It's hard to get a good picture. The first one you can see the skimmer and lights on either side (these are just plastic fixtures, we don't actually have the lights for them). One is straight down, you can see the plumbers putty I'm temporarily using to try and slow the leak down. And finally, one from under the deck where you can see the light fixture from behind.
 

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