Thinking about switching to SWG

ubal

New member
Mar 22, 2008
2
0
Tucson, AZ
#1
So many choices, decisions. . . .

Currently using bleach after dropping untold $$$ at the local pool store for the Bioguard routine. The BBB method has been working great. I'm ready to switch to SWG but have some questions on where to start. I'll list what I got now, the issues I know I have, and then my questions.

What I have now:
IG pool
20000 gal
Turbo In-floor cleaning system
Sta-Rite System 3 cartridge Filter (S7M120)
1.5 hp single speed pump

The issues I have:
Calcium hardness 990 (city water here is very hard). House is on a softener but the pool is not.
CYA is off the scale, last measured at 220 (planning a drain/refill soon)

Questions:
Can I add a SWG to this setup without any other equipment changes (ie, filter, pump)?
Can I pipe the pool fill line to the house softwater system in conjunction with a SWG?

Thanks in advance,

Tucson, AZ
 

JasonLion

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May 7, 2007
37,879
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Silver Spring, MD
#2
You need to get that CYA level down. CYA over 90 tends to cause problems, and you are way over.

Yes, you can add the SWG without any conflicts.

Home water softeners are not designed to handle the volume of water that a pool requires. It is possible to use them if you pay close attention and recharge the softener frequently while water is running to the pool but it gets to be a major pain.

There are ways to manage high CH levels up to about 1000 or 1200. Getting the CYA down will probably get the CH level down as well, which should leave you are a manageable level for now. The basic idea is to lower the TA and PH to compensate, while keeping an eye on your calcite saturation (CSI). You can use my Pool Calculator to figure out your CSI and to experiment with possible adjustments to get your CSI under control.
 

duraleigh

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Apr 1, 2007
31,266
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Sebring, Florida
tftestkits.net
#3
Ubal, welcome!!

To emphasize what Jason's saying, I will repeat it. It's really necessary for you to cut that CYA and (simultaneously)CH way down. What is the CH of your fill water?

I would strongly encourage you to drain 50% of your pool and refill. You may still have to drain some more after that but your pool water management will be easy then. Right now, it's gonna be a constant problem.
 
#4
nothing new to add to what has already been recommended... other than another model to consider.

Our Total Control, which has ORP and pH automation, has been fairly successful in Arizona with the high calcium hardness levels, which will tend to scale a cell rapidly. The result of which is premature cell failure.
You can also stay on top of the scaling by periodic and frequent additions of muriatic acid. The Total Control system will do that for you.

Hayward has recently come out with their version of the Total Control, and promotes using CO2 for pH adjustments. They do mention that a Muriatic Acid feed system is optional. I believe Pentair also has a similar system, using the Acutrol ORP pH controller.

Either way and in spite of the high CH level, keeping an eye on the Saturation Index will help proper conditions for a SCG to operate effectively.

Thanks for considering a Salt Chlorine Generator for your pool!
 

ubal

New member
Mar 22, 2008
2
0
Tucson, AZ
#6
JasonLion said:
You need to get that CYA level down. CYA over 90 tends to cause problems, and you are way over.

Yes, you can add the SWG without any conflicts.

Home water softeners are not designed to handle the volume of water that a pool requires. It is possible to use them if you pay close attention and recharge the softener frequently while water is running to the pool but it gets to be a major pain.

There are ways to manage high CH levels up to about 1000 or 1200. Getting the CYA down will probably get the CH level down as well, which should leave you are a manageable level for now. The basic idea is to lower the TA and PH to compensate, while keeping an eye on your calcite saturation (CSI). You can use my Pool Calculator to figure out your CSI and to experiment with possible adjustments to get your CSI under control.
Thanks to all who have responded. City water hardness here in my area is about 19 grains. I think that equates to approx. 324.9 ppm (1 gr/gal = 17.1 mg/l or ppm).

I have a Kinetico Softwater System. It is a twin tank system that ensures I am never without soft water. It meters the water manually based on use and automatically switches between the tanks. I think it could handle the pool.
 

Strannik

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TFP Expert
#7
ubal said:
I have a Kinetico Softwater System. It is a twin tank system that ensures I am never without soft water. It meters the water manually based on use and automatically switches between the tanks. I think it could handle the pool.
If you get a lot of rains, I would suggest getting a rain water tank instead, and using water from it to refill your pool.
 

JasonLion

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May 7, 2007
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Silver Spring, MD
#8
ubal said:
I have a Kinetico Softwater System. It is a twin tank system that ensures I am never without soft water. It meters the water manually based on use and automatically switches between the tanks.
You will still need to keep an eye on the salt level and add salt frequently while running water to the pool.
 
G
#9
Your water softener should be fine for topping off the pool. If you try and do a major refill from it you will likely deplete the resin until the next recharge cycle BUT you will end up with softer water in the pool then if you did not use itl. I use softgened water in my pool. Remember that you will have to watch your caclium and you might actually need to bump the level up from time to time. For you that would mean topping off with unsoftened water from time to time. (Unless you actually wanted to BUY calcium to add.)