Taylor CYA test

cj133

Well-known member
May 6, 2018
198
NJ
Hi all,
Every time I try to test my CYA using my K-2006C kit I'm always left with the same unsure feeling.
Am I making this test more difficult than necessary or is there a better way to test CYA?
 
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JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
15,678
Tucson, AZ
The Taylor test is about as good as it gets for a residential pool test. There are some very expensive photometric measuring devices (turbidity meters) that use blanks and NIST standards and can get you accuracy down to 0.1ppm or lower....but they run north of $500. So not really something your average-joe pool owner can afford.

Simply following the testing guidelines here on TFP and the Taylor website and you'll be fine. It takes some getting used to but once you master it, it's an easy test. The test itself really is only good to +/-15ppm, so don';t sweat trying to make an exact value. Just do the test a couple of times by reusing the same solution by pouring it back and forth between the mixing bottle and tester and then average the results. Round up to the nearest 10ppm and call it a day. Bright sunlit days (high noon) is the best time to make the measurement. Indoor lighting will skew the test and give false results
 

gorocket1981

Well-known member
Jun 8, 2018
127
Montreal, Canada
I also find it difficult to do this test and to have confident results. I am always unsure if I see the dot or not.
I tried indoor. I also tried outdoor with the technic mentioned frequently here but I see no difference between the two.
 

sacredcow

Active member
May 8, 2018
44
Houston, TX
The Taylor test is about as good as it gets for a residential pool test. There are some very expensive photometric measuring devices (turbidity meters) that use blanks and NIST standards and can get you accuracy down to 0.1ppm or lower....but they run north of $500. So not really something your average-joe pool owner can afford.

Simply following the testing guidelines here on TFP and the Taylor website and you'll be fine. It takes some getting used to but once you master it, it's an easy test. The test itself really is only good to +/-15ppm, so don';t sweat trying to make an exact value. Just do the test a couple of times by reusing the same solution by pouring it back and forth between the mixing bottle and tester and then average the results. Round up to the nearest 10ppm and call it a day. Bright sunlit days (high noon) is the best time to make the measurement. Indoor lighting will skew the test and give false results
This.

I'm a chemist for a large petroleum services company and have full access to millions of dollars worth of analytical equipment. I used to bring my water in to work to run tests on it using high-accuracy instrumentation (used an LC-Mass Spec for Cyanuric Acid, for the record). While it very much appealed to my geeky nature to go this route, the realized advantage it gave me over using a home test kit was exactly nothing. With all of the variables involved (rain, evaporation, age/quality of chemicals, kids, pets, etc...), you're never going to be able to control your pool chemistry within a bracket so small that it requires this kind of accuracy. :geek:
 

Poolmama!

Silver Supporter
Feb 20, 2019
80
Dallas, Tx