Tampa Renovation: Pool Refinish, Tile and Update Water Features

Dschnell

Active member
Feb 1, 2021
39
Tampa, Florida
We just started our pool renovation end of last week! The pool was drained and the tile is currently going in. We are going from a completely natural look to some COLOR and from a dark gray/charcoal finish to something lighter. This is going to be a big change for us!

We are getting rid of the 13 year old Premix Marbletite Marquis Quartz finish which is now like sharp razors. I loved the water color but not happy with how the finish deteriorated over the years. It carried a10 year warranty and right around year 11.5 it was sharp as knives. Our color was a blend of 60% pewter and 40% charcoal which gave us a deep blue color in certain light to dark blue-green or black at night. Two LED lights were still not enough to achieve vibrant colors. The dark finish just absorbed most of the light. I'm eager to see the difference the new finish makes in our lighting.

Our remodel includes:
-Wet Edge Signature Matrix Tahoe (still trying to decide if I should add hand cast abalone shell. Worried about issues others have had in the past)
-NPT (Master Tile) Isola Masisosar 6x6 tiles around the pool waterline
-Noble Tile Royal Crown Prinz 1x2 glass subway tile for the raised planter and in double bands on the sunshelf, steps and bench
- Delorean Gray grout
-Removal of the (IMO...unsightly) fan jets on the raised planter and replacing with Atlantic Water Garden wall spouts in oil rubbed bronze.

We are on day 4 of the process and the finish is set to go in middle of next week! If anyone has any opinion on the abalone shell I'd love to hear it!
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
24,795
Northern NJ
Pool Size
35000
Surface
Plaster
Chlorine
Salt Water Generator
SWG Type
Pentair Intellichlor IC-60
If anyone has any opinion on the abalone shell I'd love to hear it!
Abalone shells have, in the past, caused problems with plaster discoloration, specifically brown rings forming around the shell chips. The culprit seems to be non-pool grade shells being used that were not properly processed to remove all of the organics in them. These organics then slowly leach out into the plaster, react with chlorine in the pool water and form a brown ring. Nothing can remove the stain and the fix is often to simply chip-out and redo the plaster.

Discuss with the plaster applicator WHERE they are sourcing the abalone shells from. Abalone shells from a reputable plaster company and properly processed and rated for pool use should be able to be used. If the applicator can't GUARANTEE that the abalone is a pool grade material, then I would not use it.

While abalone can add a nice glittery appearance, I think the downside risks are not worth it.

Abalone, like all sea bivalves, creates it's hard shell from calcium carbonate and other minerals through biological processes. They are beautifully complex in that they use enzymes and proteins in the biological process to structure nano-scale (one-billionth of meter) material layers. Scientists and engineers would love to be able to recreate in the lab what nature has so beautifully constructed but, to date, the best humans can do is a very sad and simplistic process.

All that is to say that these creatures leave organic residues behind in their shells from the process of building them. It has been shown that abalone shells in white and light colored plasters can eventually cause brown staining (little brown halos) over time as the proteins and organics leach out into the surrounding plaster matrix. Chlorine and acid washing are not effective in fixing this.

Remember that abalone is a natural product that is derived from the shells of sea mollusks. They can and will contain organic compounds. If they are not processed and washed properly, problems can arise years later when you no longer have the PB on the hook with your money. These stains appear to be permanent and, in most cases, the plaster has had to be redone.

We have had members report brown stains in their pool from the organics in abalone decomposing. See Abalone Shell Chips Causing Brown Stains in Diamond Brite Plaster and I have a plaster problem.
 
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Dschnell

Active member
Feb 1, 2021
39
Tampa, Florida
Abalone shells have, in the past, caused problems with plaster discoloration, specifically brown rings forming around the shell chips. The culprit seems to be non-pool grade shells being used that were not properly processed to remove all of the organics in them. These organics then slowly leach out into the plaster, react with chlorine in the pool water and form a brown ring. Nothing can remove the stain and the fix is often to simply chip-out and redo the plaster.

Discuss with the plaster applicator WHERE they are sourcing the abalone shells from. Abalone shells from a reputable plaster company and properly processed and rated for pool use should be able to be used. If the applicator can't GUARANTEE that the abalone is a pool grade material, then I would not use it.

While abalone can add a nice glittery appearance, I think the downside risks are not worth it.

Abalone, like all sea bivalves, creates it's hard shell from calcium carbonate and other minerals through biological processes. They are beautifully complex in that they use enzymes and proteins in the biological process to structure nano-scale (one-billionth of meter) material layers. Scientists and engineers would love to be able to recreate in the lab what nature has so beautifully constructed but, to date, the best humans can do is a very sad and simplistic process.

All that is to say that these creatures leave organic residues behind in their shells from the process of building them. It has been shown that abalone shells in white and light colored plasters can eventually cause brown staining (little brown halos) over time as the proteins and organics leach out into the surrounding plaster matrix. Chlorine and acid washing are not effective in fixing this.

Remember that abalone is a natural product that is derived from the shells of sea mollusks. They can and will contain organic compounds. If they are not processed and washed properly, problems can arise years later when you no longer have the PB on the hook with your money. These stains appear to be permanent and, in most cases, the plaster has had to be redone.

We have had members report brown stains in their pool from the organics in abalone decomposing. See Abalone Shell Chips Causing Brown Stains in Diamond Brite Plaster and I have a plaster problem.
This is EXACTLY what I read about and why I'm hesitant. I and using a reputable, Wet Edge certified installer who came highly recommended from Wet Edge corporate office. I will still ask, but have been rest assured that all products they use come straight from Wet Edge and are labeled as such on the product packaging bags they come in. Not sure if I have read about Wet Edge customers having this issue. I can also get blue glass for the same cost as the abalone per ft, but the difference is abalone would be hand cast to the pool floor, sunshelf, steps and bench, not the walls which is a significant savings. My installer does not recommend hand casting the glass beads as they can land very unevenly. He recommends mixing them in which would mean more $ since it would go throughout the whole pool. Double the cost of the abalone.
 
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