SWG Experiences and Recommendations?

in-two

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2011
51
Sabina, Italy
I am just about to go the SWCG route here in Italy and would very much like to hear more 'real life' experiences of using the various brands. Hayward and Pentair are available at high prices, Zodiac is more commonly available. Any help would be much appreciated,

Cheers
Zed
 

Jonette2

Well-known member
Aug 4, 2013
100
Oklahoma
Re: SWG Reccomendations...In your experience, what is the best system?

in-two, we had our pool for 1 season and it was terrible, the algae was ruining our lives. we switched to salt water and our pool is fun ! its pretty simple really.
 

jblizzle

Mod Squad
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May 19, 2010
43,238
Tucson, AZ
Re: SWG Reccomendations...In your experience, what is the best system?

in-two, we had our pool for 1 season and it was terrible, the algae was ruining our lives. we switched to salt water and our pool is fun ! its pretty simple really.
Whether you had a SWG or not has nothing to do with your algae problems ... that was due to improper chemistry maintenance. You could have the same issues with a SWG.
 

ping

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Jun 24, 2011
3,138
Long Beach, CA
You have a large pool and should get a cell rated for 60,000 US gallons. There are only a few companies that make a cell that large and I'm not sure what's available in Italy. Post the models that you have available in that size of cell and we can offer our 2 cents from those choices.
 

pooldv

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Aug 10, 2012
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FL panhandle
I am very happy with my Pentair after 3 years. The Pentair IC60 would work well for you. Not cheap though.
 

cowboycasey

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Jul 3, 2013
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Fletcher, OK
that is 1 big pool :) 42000 gallons, most definatly go with a 60k cell, you will have to run it at 70% or so and the cell will probably not last over 4 years (the higher % you run them)... it will also depend on how long you run your pump...
 

Scuba_Steve

Well-known member
May 16, 2015
311
Pooler, GA
Just curious... It is usually recommended that you go with a cell rated 2x larger than the volume. If a 60k cell is as large as you can go, then wouldn't he be better off using 2 generators with 40k cells? Much like my Intex joke, but more practical.
 

n240sxguy

Well-known member
May 17, 2014
1,802
Benton, KY
Just curious... It is usually recommended that you go with a cell rated 2x larger than the volume. If a 60k cell is as large as you can go, then wouldn't he be better off using 2 generators with 40k cells? Much like my Intex joke, but more practical.
I say go with two 60's and be done with it. Or move up to a commercial one.


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cowboycasey

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Jul 3, 2013
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Fletcher, OK
Just curious... It is usually recommended that you go with a cell rated 2x larger than the volume. If a 60k cell is as large as you can go, then wouldn't he be better off using 2 generators with 40k cells? Much like my Intex joke, but more practical.


I say go with two 60's and be done with it. Or move up to a commercial one.


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Interesting, never thought about doing that...

like 2 of the hayward's would work well ( i would think) and be 80k, twice the size of your pool :)
 

in-two

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2011
51
Sabina, Italy
You have a large pool and should get a cell rated for 60,000 US gallons. There are only a few companies that make a cell that large and I'm not sure what's available in Italy. Post the models that you have available in that size of cell and we can offer our 2 cents from those choices.
Thanks for your interest, it looks like the only fairly big swcg's available here are made by the Australian company Autochlor. They make a range that produce up to 92 g/hour, the RP 92. Plugging my numbers into their calculator their recommendation is from the 50g/hour running 12 hours a day to the 92 g/hour running 8 hours a day. Does 60k mean 60,000 US gallons? There are also Zodiac, CTX and pool pilot brands available but none advertised in the bigger (over 35g/h) sizes.
My issue is that I'm not at the house with the pool all the time and can't get reliable manual dosing organised anymore and feel that chlorine pumps/puck feeders won't be as reliable/effective. I'm guessing I also need a Ph regulator/acid pump so any opinions on the way to go there would also be welcome. Sorry about the metric measurements, it's after midnight here by the pool and I can't trust myself to do the conversions after a few 'refreshing beverages'...
 

in-two

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2011
51
Sabina, Italy
I have just realized that I asked much the same question exactly a year ago and got some good answers, duh! The beverages must be getting to me ...
Anybody have any experience of Autochlor before I jump in with the big 92 unit?
 

jvrobert

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Aug 1, 2014
54
Mesa AZ
An ic60 (or other 60k gallon unit) would be large enough. The recommendation to go oversized is related to how often you have to replace.

A 60k gallon unit will produce enough chlorine but you might have to replace the cell e.g. every 3 years versus 4 years.

You still might be better off versus buying a specialty or oversize unit. If it costs 3x as much for a 90k swg but you only replace cell every 5 years it's probably still not worth the 3x hit up front.
 

chem geek

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Mar 28, 2007
12,083
San Rafael, CA USA
It is worth getting the larger IC60 cell rather than two IC40 cells even though the IC40's will last longer (because their ontime will be lower). See Economics of Saltwater Chlorine Generators. The reason the IC60 is more economical is that the price rises much more slowly than the increased capacity. So on a $ per pound chlorine generated, it's the most economical. The IC40 is not terrible, but even those with more average sized pools should get the IC40 rather than the IC20 (unless the pool is VERY small such that the IC40 would raise the FC at the returns by too much).