Suction Vac Questions: Schedule and Leaving in Pool

Copernicu

Bronze Supporter
Jul 22, 2020
22
Phoenix, Arizona
I recently upgraded my old Hayward to a Hayward Phoenix (AquaNaut) 4 wheel.

For years, I left the robot in the pool 24/7, ran the motor at night, and usually had the robot plugged into the skimmer (so it ran during the night while the motor ran). A pool store employee recently told me I should run the robot only 1 or 2 times per week, and that I should continue to run the pool motor every night (1 hour for each 10 degrees of outside temperature). He said the water circulates better when the robot is not hooked up to the skimmer. I was also told I can leave the robot in the pool, although some pool store employees suggested taking it out when doing a "shock" treatment.

Since I no longer trust pool store recommendations, I'm curious to find out the real deal....

1. How often should run the robot? And for how long?

2. Can I leave it in the pool 24/7? Note that I am in Phoenix and the temperature in the summer can be well over 100 degrees for months. [This year, we set a record of at least 38 days at 110 degrees or higher!]

3. I assume I should continue to run the pool motor every night? Does one hour for each 10 degrees of outside temperature make sense (11 hours when it's 110 during the day)?
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
6,920
Central California
There is no formula for runtimes, either for pool or vac. If you're not running an SWG or solar heater or spa, the only things you have to accomplish are circulating your pool enough to keep the chlorine distributed, and to clean your pool (filtering, vacuuming and skimming). The chlorine you add gets mixed in long before you accomplish those other three tasks, so you don't have to calculate for that. The rest is up to your own preferences. Start with a few hours of runtime. If the water isn't clear enough for you, up the runtime for the filter. If the bottom is a little too dirty for you, then up the runtime for the vac. If the surface has a few too many leaves for your liking, up the runtime for the skimmer. One of those three things will "govern" the runtime, the other two will get accomplished during the same cycle. It's a trial and error thing. And it will likely change with the seasons. More skimming and vacuuming in the fall. Less filtering in the winter. Etc. If you can do all the cleaning in a few hours, then you can save some dough on your electric bill. If you have a bunch of trees and a messy pool, then you might have to run for a half a day or more. Some here like to run their pump 24/7. Every pool and its environment is unique, as are their owners' preferences. That's why there is no formula. You have to create your own by experimenting.

Blah, blah, blah, that's why the pool store gives you a simple formula, so they can get on with selling you a bunch of hooey products, instead of taking the time to explain all that properly!! ;)

Hope that helps.
 
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Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
6,920
Central California
Oh, #2. I leave mine in the pool 24/365, but I have a dedicated vacuum port, so there is no impact to the skimmer. If I'm understanding your setup, you can't leave the vac connected because the skimmer won't skim. Best to disconnect it after each use. But as per my other post, if your bottom stays clean enough by vacuuming once or twice a week, then that's all you need to do. If you need to run it every day, then you do that.
 
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Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
6,920
Central California
In general, what you have we call a vacuum (vac, suction vac, pressure vac, automated vac, etc). Robots are the kind that don't connect to your pump at all, but run off of electricity and are self-contained. Which might be your ultimate solution. A robot can run whenever, and the pump can be on or off. They don't affect skimming or circulation.