Substitute for chlorine tablets???

dhimpel

Active member
Jun 4, 2015
31
Basehor Kansas
I'm pretty new to this forum. For the last year I have been using a chlorinator with 3" tablets in it to keep my chlorine levels up. This year I noticed that it wasn't keeping up with my chlorine levels very well and my CYA is too high also. What can I use instead of the 3" tablets too keep my chlorine levels up?
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
17,216
Tucson, AZ
I'm pretty new to this forum. For the last year I have been using a chlorinator with 3" tablets in it to keep my chlorine levels up. This year I noticed that it wasn't keeping up with my chlorine levels very well and my CYA is too high also. What can I use instead of the 3" tablets too keep my chlorine levels up?
Have you gone to the PoolSchool link yet and read ABCs of Pool Water Chemistry?

The use of trichlor 3" pucks is pretty much industry standard teaching for pool water chlorination. What they fail to mention is that constant use of the pucks over-stabilizes pool water (CYA gets too high) and then the chlorine is no longer effective. Then, instead of fixing the problem, you are led by the pool stores to use ever increasingly expensive chemical solutions (algaecides, shock powders, etc) that only make the water worse.

If you want to follow the TFPC Method , then you will need to read up on the links in PoolSchool and make the switch to liquid chlorine or bleach. You will also need to purchase one of the Recommended Testkits (either the TF-100 or the Taylor K-2006) and get away from pool store water testing. Once you take control of your own testing, you will find that your pool is very easy to maintain using the methods taught here.

And, where are my manners!?!? I failed to say this - Welcome to TFP! :wave:
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
17,216
Tucson, AZ
Splash,

is this topic a reminder to read the Poolschool or do you have actual suggestions as to substitute? (would love if anyone knew of one).
The only substitute method for water chlorination taught here is bleach/liquid chlorine. All forms of solid chlorine, either in powder form or in pucks, add unwanted chemicals to your water. All of the chlorinated cyanurate chemicals (dichlor and trichlor) add too much CYA over time and cal-hypo drives up the waters calcium hardness. Lithium hypochlorite is a solid form of chlorine that will not affect water chemistry (the lithium ion doesn't really do anything) BUT it is way too expensive to use on a regular basis for daily water chlorination. Chlorine gas is available in some areas by direct injection into the pool water but it has to be performed by a qualified and trained service company and you'll only get injections once per week which is an insufficient frequency for proper water sanitation.

In short, the only reliable method for water chlorination is liquid chlorine or bleach.
 

dhimpel

Active member
Jun 4, 2015
31
Basehor Kansas
Thanks for the feedback. Does anybody have a specific brand of bleach or liquid chlorine they use?? Also does anyone know how much is needed? I got my test kit ordered the other day. Got tired of using test strip and guessing what my levels were.
 

Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Many people will simply go to their local grocery store or Wal-Mart and get the generic (regular) bleach. It all boils-down to cost and percentage (strength). Most common bottle will be 8.25%, but regionally, some carriers may have 10 or 12%. As long as the active ingredient is Sodium Hypochlorite, and the batch is not too old, you're good to go.
 

COBrien

Well-known member
May 6, 2015
184
Chickasha, OK
For my SLAM, I used Great Value concentrated bleach (8.25%) from Walmart. Unscented, plain old bleach (i.e., not EZ-Pour, Splashless, etc.).

I have now discovered that Atwood's sells 10% "Liquid Pool Shock" for $2.00 per gallon, or 4-gallon cases for $7.99. Takes less liquid to get where I need to be, and it's cheaper than the GV bleach I was using.
 

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
17,216
Tucson, AZ
Just be careful when purchasing liquid chlorine products and consider two things -

1. Bleach degrades over time. The higher the concentration, the faster the rate of breakdown - see this post;

2. Always check the date codes - how to read bleach date codes.

Always store bleach in a cool, dark space (never outside in a shed in the heat and/or humidity).