Spa light junction eliminate

kcindc

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Sep 2, 2011
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Fairfax, VA
My spa light has a junction box the sits in the middle of the yard. It is an eye sore and a tripping hazard. I need to replace the spa light as it doesn't work (rusted water inside probably circa 1980s). Is there a way to eliminate this and marry up the two conduits below ground without having to replace the entire conduit?IMG_0533.JPG thanks!


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Richard320

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Jan 6, 2010
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San Dimas, CA (LA County)
Short answer: no. I know I've seen pictures of flush-mounted boxes, so I googled and followed a link from an image to NEC Requirements for Installing Pools and Spas, Part 2 of 3

For luminaires greater than 15V, the junction box must be at least [680.24(A)(2)]:

4 in. above the ground or pool deck or not less than 8 in. above the maximum water level ( Fig. 2 ).

4 ft from the inside wall of the pool, unless separated by a solid fence, wall, or other permanent barrier.

For luminaires less than 15V, you can use a flush deck box if [680.24(A)(2)]:

An approved potting compound prevents the entrance of moisture.

The flush deck box is at least 4 ft from the inside wall of the pool.
If your pool lighting is low voltage, then you could dig things up and install a flush mount.
 

kcindc

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Fairfax, VA
What I want to do is to join the two conduits eliminate the junction and put in a light with a cord long enough to reach from the spa to electrical breaker panel at my equipment pad.

Or if a junction is needed put it closer to the electrical panel instead of out in the yard without having to dig a whole new complete trench from the spa to the electric panel.
 

bdavis466

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Aug 4, 2014
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San Clemente, CA
You need a junction box on 120v lights but you can move it near your panel. Keep in mind that you must also run a new #8 ground wire in the conduit (if the conduit is a non-metallic material).

The trouble you are going to have is splicing the existing conduit sections together and making them watertight if they are made of anything other than PVC.
 

Joboo

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Sep 4, 2016
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ty/jk

bdavis466

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Aug 4, 2014
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San Clemente, CA
The conduit is flooded so the height eliminates the chance of water entering the area where the electrical splices were made.
 

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