Sodium Bromide, Bromine and Ozonator

msterb

Member
Dec 12, 2020
5
Norway
Hi,

I have this Salt Water System called Blue Fusion from Blu Water Technology. The system work properly with sodium bromide (1300-1500 ppm) and the electrolysis is generating bromine and I am able to maintain a bromine reading of 2-6.

1) Are there any pros and cons to connect the Ozonator in the spa?

2) Will the Ozonator reduce the necessary time of circulation? At this moment I have circulation 24/7.

3) Will use of Ozonator requires less Sodium Bromide in the water?
 

RDspaguy

In The Industry
Mar 21, 2020
1,408
Cabool, Mo
1) Ozone is an oxidizer, or shock, that theoretically will generate bromine from bromide, like any other oxidizer. However, given the lower reactivity of bromide compared to chlorine and the low level of ozone interaction (limited to the water flowing through a 3/4" pipe at about 10gpm give or take), it is not extremely effective. Throw in variables such as ozonator output, spa volume, run time, flow rate, and individual use and it becomes an unknown. I love ozone in a chlorine spa to burn off cc and excess fc, but have never used it with bromine myself, though many people have and do.
2) Ozone is most effective with 24/7 injection. If your spa uses a circulation pump for 24/7 circulation, as opposed to low speed on the main pump, you may not be able to change it. But, under those circumstances you wouldn't want to. The circulation pump likely uses less power than a 100w light bulb.
3) No. You need a sufficient bromide bank to produce bromine. If anything, it would increase, as ozone will, theoretically, burn off bromine as well. It might allow for lower bromine residuals.
I say "theoretically" because I have read in studies that it does in the lab, but am not sure how that really translates to a spa situation from personal experience.
 

msterb

Member
Dec 12, 2020
5
Norway
1) Ozone is an oxidizer, or shock, that theoretically will generate bromine from bromide, like any other oxidizer. However, given the lower reactivity of bromide compared to chlorine and the low level of ozone interaction (limited to the water flowing through a 3/4" pipe at about 10gpm give or take), it is not extremely effective. Throw in variables such as ozonator output, spa volume, run time, flow rate, and individual use and it becomes an unknown. I love ozone in a chlorine spa to burn off cc and excess fc, but have never used it with bromine myself, though many people have and do.
2) Ozone is most effective with 24/7 injection. If your spa uses a circulation pump for 24/7 circulation, as opposed to low speed on the main pump, you may not be able to change it. But, under those circumstances you wouldn't want to. The circulation pump likely uses less power than a 100w light bulb.
3) No. You need a sufficient bromide bank to produce bromine. If anything, it would increase, as ozone will, theoretically, burn off bromine as well. It might allow for lower bromine residuals.
I say "theoretically" because I have read in studies that it does in the lab, but am not sure how that really translates to a spa situation from personal experience.
Thanks for your detailed answer.

1) Of course dependent on the output of the ozone, lets say everything equal, will it however increase the bromine reading if I turn on the ozone?

2) Sometimes after bathing we feel the skin is kind of irritated. May use of ozone with reduced power setting of the salt system affect such irritation?
I heard somethings about bromamines/brominates (not sure what they called)
 

RDspaguy

In The Industry
Mar 21, 2020
1,408
Cabool, Mo
1) Theoretically, ozone will produce bromine from bromide, and will burn off bromine. The exact relationship of these is quite beyond me, as I am a repair man not a chemist. I don't use bromine myself.
2) I have no idea. Try it and see.
 
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