So long BBQG, hello TFP

G

Guest

#1
Hi all,

Thanks to Greg Gunkel for giving me the heads-up on the new BBQ Island forum on TFP. :cheers:

I've been a TFP subscriber for a while, but will definitely be back more frequently as this forum grows.

I'm nearing the completion of my project and have many pictures to post.

If anyone has advise on applying stucco, I'm all ears. I'm literally starting from scratch (pun intended) and have to learn everything before I start.

Todd. :chef:
 

JohnT

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#4
Very nice!

Switching to engineer mode: Do you have an electrical ground wire connected to one (or more) of those metal studs? If not, it would be a really good idea.
 
G

Guest

#5
JohnT said:
Very nice!

Switching to engineer mode: Do you have an electrical ground wire connected to one (or more) of those metal studs? If not, it would be a really good idea.
Thank you.

For the low voltage wiring, no. Do I need one? I haven't hooked up the outlets and switches yet.

What's the safest way to ground to the studs?

Todd :chef:
 

JohnT

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#7
BradnerBoy said:
JohnT said:
Very nice!

Switching to engineer mode: Do you have an electrical ground wire connected to one (or more) of those metal studs? If not, it would be a really good idea.
Thank you.

For the low voltage wiring, no. Do I need one? I haven't hooked up the outlets and switches yet.

What's the safest way to ground to the studs?

Todd :chef:
For the LV, no, but if the transformer is there or you are adding outlets and switches, you should. Just in case a bare hot-wire were to contact the frame, it would trip the breaker rather than zap somebody leaning on the bar. I'd get a screw or bolt with a star-type lock washer to connect a ground wire someplace convenient.
 
G

Guest

#8
JohnT said:
For the LV, no, but if the transformer is there or you are adding outlets and switches, you should. Just in case a bare hot-wire were to contact the frame, it would trip the breaker rather than zap somebody leaning on the bar. I'd get a screw or bolt with a star-type lock washer to connect a ground wire someplace convenient.
I'm using GFCI outlets to be on the safe side. Would a ground to the studs still be a good idea, or do you think I'm covered with the GFCI?
 

JohnT

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#10
BradnerBoy said:
JohnT said:
For the LV, no, but if the transformer is there or you are adding outlets and switches, you should. Just in case a bare hot-wire were to contact the frame, it would trip the breaker rather than zap somebody leaning on the bar. I'd get a screw or bolt with a star-type lock washer to connect a ground wire someplace convenient.
I'm using GFCI outlets to be on the safe side. Would a ground to the studs still be a good idea, or do you think I'm covered with the GFCI?
GFCI is certainly the way to go, but grounding is safer yet, and is probably required by code. Generally, anything conductive that has a good chance of becoming energized, must be grounded. It's cheap and easy to do, and will work in case a GFCI fails. Doubly so in a pool area where people and the floor are likely to be wet.
 
G
#11
JohnT said:
GFCI is certainly the way to go, but grounding is safer yet, and is probably required by code. Generally, anything conductive that has a good chance of becoming energized, must be grounded. It's cheap and easy to do, and will work in case a GFCI fails. Doubly so in a pool area where people and the floor are likely to be wet.
Can I simply come off an outlet's ground wire screw with a length of copper and attached it to a stud as you've described and that should take care of it?

'preciate the help.
 

JohnT

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#12
BradnerBoy said:
Can I simply come off an outlet's ground wire screw with a length of copper and attached it to a stud as you've described and that should take care of it?

'preciate the help.
That should be good, but it might not be code. If you are using metal outlet boxes, the connection of the box MIGHT be good enough. I'm paranoid about grounding, as I've worked on 12KV systems before, and that much voltage will come out to meet you.
 
G
#13
JohnT said:
That should be good, but it might not be code. If you are using metal outlet boxes, the connection of the box MIGHT be good enough. I'm paranoid about grounding, as I've worked on 12KV systems before, and that much voltage will come out to meet you.
The boxes are plastic.

How do you recommend I do the grounding?
 

JohnT

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#14
BradnerBoy said:
The boxes are plastic.

How do you recommend I do the grounding?
I'd just take the grounds as they go to the box and run them to a convenient spot on a stud nearby. Self drilling screws are really handy for this kind of connection.
 
G
#15
JohnT said:
I'd just take the grounds as they go to the box and run them to a convenient spot on a stud nearby. Self drilling screws are really handy for this kind of connection.
And not ground them in the box, but directly to the stud?
 

JohnT

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#16
Normally, the ground on the outlet/switch also goes to the metal box. With plastic boxes, that's not required. Just twist a piece of bare copper in with the incoming and outgoing ground and take it out the back of the box to the stud.
 
G
#18
Thanks Greg.

It's stucco time. Did you find some good info on the web when you did yours? Can you point me to good sources?

Todd :chef:
 

DrDave

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#19
In order to avoid a ground loop, run your AC ground to a steel stud at the end of the daisy chain of outlets. Your DC should not share this ground or you may produce an AC hum in any sound systems attached. Keep your low voltage DC floating.