Slight leak in suction line. Is there a fix without replumbing??

George in Georgia

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 9, 2010
69
Jonesboro, GA
I seem to have a slight leak in the suction line; while the strainer basket does slowly fill up there is sometimes a little air being pumped. The previous owner plumbed the pump so that there is VERY little space between the Jandy valve assembly and the pump assembly. I think that the leak is in the juncture between the valve assembly and the pump strainer assembly. I have been able to "seal" it with a plastic, stretchy adhesive electrical tape, but this is a temporary fix. Any suggestions for a better fix, outside of replumbing the whole thing?
 
  • Like
Reactions: TeamNelson

duraleigh

Admin
Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
In The Industry
Apr 1, 2007
34,428
Sebring, Florida
First, Identify that that really is the source of the leak. Then I see two options.

They make a plumbers tape to wrap around that pipe and seal it pretty good.....check it out at Lowe's / Home depot

Depending on how bad the gap is, you may be able to use PVC solvent to prime and clean that joint and then fill it in with PVC cement.

Neither of these fixes would be possible if it were not on the suction side but I think I would try one or the other. Cheap fix and pretty permanent.
 

George in Georgia

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 9, 2010
69
Jonesboro, GA
Many thanks, Duraleigh!
I like the PVC solvent and cement. It sounds a bit more permanent than the plumber's tape, since it in a sense "welds" the two ends of the gap together.
As far as identifying the source of the leak, how about removing the electrical tape I'd used, cleaning up the area, then wrapping some cloth soaked in dishwashing liquid around the suspected area. With the pump running the detergent would be sucked in and should foam up in the pump strainer basket. Then shut it down and go to phase two.
With the pump off, rinse off the detergent, and let the area dry out thoroughly. Then, apply the solvent followed by the PVC cement. Allow more time to let everything dry, cross my fingers and fire up the pump, so to speak!
I'd appreciate any comments, suggestions, etc on my proposed course of action.
 

George in Georgia

LifeTime Supporter
Jul 9, 2010
69
Jonesboro, GA
I like your solution for finding leaks! The problem is that the prior owner built a pool house around the pump filter installation. They didn't think to furnish a floor drain...but then they went cheap on the roof by omitting roofing paper! Grrrr......!
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
7,119
Central California
Can you get a bucket or pan or squashed milk jug or something under where you need to test? Even a few towels could work. I wouldn't think you'd need much of a stream of water to test a pinhole leak...
 

doug.hillmer

Member
Apr 3, 2011
10
San Diego, CA
So, did you ever find out where it was?
I had one once, turned out to be the Oring for the handle of the intake valve that is used to choose between SPA and Pool input. An easy fix, but had me scratching my head for a while.