Shotcrete/gunite

JoyfulNoise

TFP Expert
Platinum Supporter
May 23, 2015
16,034
Tucson, AZ
I’ve read the first 48hours is the most critical as that is when concrete achieves something like 90% of its strength. After that, it’s just slow curing....I think there’s some structures the Romans made out of concrete that are still technically curing....
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,673
Central California
I've been trying to sell this idea here lately. I get a commission. ;)

Are you on metered water? Right before the fill (coordinate this with the PB):

Start with all the water out of the pool (that's how the plasterer's should leave it). Have everybody in your household take their showers, use the toilets, wash the dishes, etc. Then go read your city's water meter and record the number. Start the fill and resist using any water (or if you have to use the toilet(s), keep track of the number of flushes). No showers. No laundry. No watering the lawns, etc. When the fill is finished, go read and record the meter reading (then go to the bathroom)!!

Calculate the difference between the two numbers, subtract a gallon or two for every flush you snuck in there, and voila! You'll have a very accurate number for pool water volume, which will help you with all your future pool water chemistry adjustments.

Some meters are in gallons, others are in units. You'll need to know which and do the proper math...

BTW, we've got another poster here whose PB dumped the responsibility of the fill into his lap. He's got big problems now because he needed to stop his fill for a period of time. Do not stop the fill of your new plaster/pebble pool! You want to fill it as fast as you can, in one continuous shot, to avoid getting any kind of ring.

Are you going to be taking care of the pool yourself? Do you have your test kit yet? Have you been practicing with it? Now's the time...
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,673
Central California
I used to try to sell my metering idea using a similar meter (like the kind you'd put at the curb). That's how I measured my pool. But they're about $60, so I think that drove 'em away. My new sales pitch only requires a little inconvenience, but no cash. So far sales have not been any better! :(

In addition to the meter, I had to buy adaptors for the hose. And then a second hose to reach the deep end (not a good idea to splash water over the side onto new plaster). Then there's the issue of filling fast enough. You could try running two or three hoses together into a meter, and you'd probably get a little better flow than one hose, but not like you will using the street's meter and all your hoses unrestricted...
 

needsajet

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jan 4, 2016
4,703
Sydney, NSW, Australia
It's a great idea to take advantage of your water meter. You could also take a reading a week or two before the fill, and then get your average daily use before the fill, which could then be subtracted. Just for example, we use around 125 gallons most days, and bigger days are around 150. Our toilets are on recycled water, which would add another 20/25 gallons and garden irrigation (or concrete bonding :)) would throw it off.
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
3,887
Damascus, MD
Poolgate - you can’t trust “water company’s” meter.. for an accurate volume count you must fill pool in 1 gallon increments, and measure each by weight. Start pumping!! I’ll lend you a Shinmaywa:)
Yeah I figured that but gotta be no more than + - 10% off, right? The chemicals I put in I base on that volume and I get what I am supposed to get so I think it is close enough.
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,673
Central California
I think you guys are joking, but just in case... The meter I used to measure my pool volume is accurate to ±1.5%, which is typical for most street meters. In my case that would be less than 200 gallons (so I really shouldn't be bragging that I know exactly how much water is in my pool!). So technically that could throw off levels of chlorine, acid, etc by a bit (well, by 1.5%!). But the bigger issue is the test results, which can vary by as much as 15% (CYA testing is especially bad in that regard). So no matter what you come up with off a water meter it's going to be plenty accurate for pool maintenance, and considerably more accurate than trying to guesstimate how much water is in a free-form pool!
 

Dirk

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Nov 12, 2017
4,673
Central California
Yes - sick senses of humor.
Well, you did use a smiley... ;)

But you guys did bring up an important concept, about accuracy. The tests and the water volume can only get you in the ballpark because of their combined accuracy factor, so you still have to pay attention to how your water and surfaces are actually doing. You can't ignore real-world conditions just because you "know" you have the exact correct level of this or that. I just went through this. I know my water volume, and I know I poured in a gallon or CYA. But the pool is still acting (and testing) like there's not enough CYA. So I have to add some more CYA in spite of my measuring efforts...