Severed return jet line.

DLDowney

Member
Jan 18, 2017
10
New Orleans, Louisiana
We currently have a company demoing and re-pouring our concrete pool deck. In the process of putting down the form one of the young inexperienced guys drove a stake through our return jet line. After hearing a huge commotion, my wife went outside to see what was going on and the head guy asked us to drain the pool below the jet (at least 2 feet of a 20,000ish gallon in ground pool). He said he will come back tomorrow and dig the line up and repair it.

I have very little faith in this company now especially since they broke sections of our flagstone coping that weren't near the deck from missed swings of a sledge hammer, my question is is this as simple as cutting out a section of bad PVC and replacing that section using regular PVC glue? Is there anything I should be aware of or concerned about? After they pour the concrete we'll have no idea what's going on under there.

Thanks for any input!

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Last edited:

avspin

Gold Supporter
Jun 3, 2015
132
Reno, NV
Repairing the broken PVC is a simple job with glue. He may need to use a union since there will likely be no play.
My concrete guy broke the main drain line while the pool was being installed (pool filled). This happened where concrete stairs were going. Had to swim down and cover drain with cellophane to stop the water from rushing out, then dive & plug later. Repaired the pipe and finished the stairs. That was almost 20 years ago and no problems.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
19,725
You don't need to drain the pool. Just plug the lines and turn off the equipment at the breaker (not just the timer because the timer will turn the pump back on).

Open the filter air relief to stop any siphoning from the suction.

The fix is relatively simple and should be secure as long as it's done correctly.
 

avspin

Gold Supporter
Jun 3, 2015
132
Reno, NV
Also make sure he tests the repair with the pump off and on. I replaced a union and it ran all day no leak. Then, when it was off it dripped. Just needed to re-seat.
 
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DLDowney

Member
Jan 18, 2017
10
New Orleans, Louisiana
Just an update:
The guys came back today and told my wife that they're cutting the pipe and putting a sleeve on it. Unless sleeve is his way of saying replacing the broken section, does this sound right? I'm not home, but I did tell my wife to get clarification.
 

avspin

Gold Supporter
Jun 3, 2015
132
Reno, NV
I would believe that he means coupler. Which is fine if he is able to move the pipe back at least an inch or more to get it on. If not he must use a union.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
19,725
There are a few different types of couplings that can be used. Some are more permanent than others.

You can use (4) 90s if there's no room to shift the pipe. It's more secure than unions or sleeves, but it it's not as efficient as far as hydraulics is concerned.

The efficiency hit isn't too bad as long as the flow rate is below 6 ft/sec.

You can use 90s that are one size up from the pipe to reduce the efficiency loss.

Maybe post a picture of the fix so we can see what they do.
 
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DLDowney

Member
Jan 18, 2017
10
New Orleans, Louisiana
There are a few different types of couplings that can be used. Some are more permanent than others.

You can use (4) 90s if there's no room to shift the pipe. It's more secure than unions or sleeves, but it it's not as efficient as far as hydraulics is concerned.

The efficiency hit isn't too bad as long as the flow rate is below 6 ft/sec.

You can use 90s that are one size up from the pipe to reduce the efficiency loss.

Maybe post a picture of the fix so we can see what they do.
Using four 90s is exactly what they did. They also in so many words “blamed” us for them hammering a stake into the return line because the line wasn’t directly under the original deck. My thought is, how is it supposed to get under the deck being that the filter is 50 feet away?!?!

Here’s a pic of the fix:
 

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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
19,725
That should be fine assuming the glue joints are done correctly.

I would have used 2" 90s to reduce the head loss (resistance), but it's not a big deal.
 
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djdonte

Well-known member
Mar 25, 2019
325
Houston, TX
I would have preferred they 90 laterally rather than up to keep the depth the same. Make sure you pull some measurements so you know where the shallower line is after concrete is poured, in case you ever need to drill for anything like pergola, pool fence etc.
 
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