seafoam green pool....stumped just about everyone!!!

shayy_1988

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
56
Miami
Hi Guys! I'm new here :)

We are in the very LONG process of building our inground pool so we bought a 16x48 vinyl intex pool for the summer. We put it up at the end of May and things have been great until last week. I will be honest, I have never owned any type of pool before so yes, I am a newbie haha.

On 7/8/21 I arrived home from work to the pool looking teal/green. I could still see the bottom though. I used a brush to scrub the bottom and noticed it was some form of algae. I put one pound of chlorinated shock, cleaned the filter, brushed and allowed the pump to run.

On 7/9/21 early in the morning I brushed the pool walls again and let the pump run until I arrived from work at 4pm. At that time, I cleaned the filter, brushed the walls and vacuumed, poured 64oz of algaecide and let the pump run overnight. I do want to mention the vacuum I have is nothing fancy its one that runs with the garden hose and has a mesh bag.

On 7/10/21 I saw little change except now it looked more like a seafoam green. I poured a jug of liquid chlorine in the pool, brushed the walls and let the pump keep running.

On 7/11/21 we had the water levels tested at the pool store and everything was fine except the high chlorine of course due to the shock and liquid chlorine. We started to think our 1500 pump just wasn't doing the job. So we went out and purchased the larger 2500 pump and its definitely moving faster than the old pump-- it's been running for almost 24 hours now.

Today, 7/12/21 at 7 am, I shut the pump off and cleaned the filter of the new pump (it was dirty). This time I didn't brush the walls-- instead I vacuumed the bottom. I left the pump to run while I am at work.

Honestly, today is day 5 with little to no change and I am at the point of draining and refilling. This problem has seemed to stump just about everybody I have spoken to. I am attaching a couple of photos. Any suggestions????
 

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Texas Splash

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Welcome to TFP! :wave: You have algae. You need to follow our SLAM Process through until completion (3 SLAM criteria) to kill and remove all algae. You also need to test your own water using a TF-100 or Taylor K-2006C test kit. Liquid chlorine maintained at the proper level based on your current CYA is the answer, and the SLAM Process will get you there.

 
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zea3

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2009
14,020
Houston, Texas
Hi, welcome to TFP! You really need a good test kit. You have algae and that is most if not all of the problem. It is good that you have the larger pump/filter combo as the smaller ones are almost usesless. When you first filled the pool, was it clear or did the water have a tint to it? What products have you used in your pool so far?
 

shayy_1988

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
56
Miami
Hi, welcome to TFP! You really need a good test kit. You have algae and that is most if not all of the problem. It is good that you have the larger pump/filter combo as the smaller ones are almost usesless. When you first filled the pool, was it clear or did the water have a tint to it? What products have you used in your pool so far?
Hi! Thanks for the welcome :). I will look into purchasing a test kit right now since I have just been just going to the pool stores. Any suggestions on good ones I can order today? I definitely think the bigger pump is already a great investment. When we first filled it, yes it has a little tint to it. We had the water tested at the store and added suggested products to get the proper levels of (calcium, ph, alkalinity, chlorine and CYA). Once we added all of that it was blue and clear up until last week. I did have a July 4th party and didn't run the pump for two days after ( I know bad idea). It has been raining constantly here in south Florida so I know that has not helped at all!!!!
 

zea3

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 10, 2009
14,020
Houston, Texas
Get an FAS/DPD based test kit. You can get the TF 100 from tftestkits.net or the Taylor K2006, which is available online at multiple retailers. I'll share some information with you on why we don't follow conventional pool industry recommendations.

The problem with conventional recommendations is that they treat each chemical value as a separate entity that has no relationship to any other chemical value. For example, conventional recommendations only look at chemical values in their individual ranges, such as FC (chlorine) must be between 1-3ppm, without taking into account how other chemical values interact with each other. This is why they will say a CYA of 90 and FC of 2 are "perfect", because they both fall within the acceptable range for each value. However, CYA and Chlorine must be maintained in a proper ratio to each other. If you look at the FC/CYA Chart you will see that if CYA is 90 in a manually chlorinated pool, FC of 2 is far too low and algae will form under those conditions.

TA and pH are another example. Conventional standards want a TA of 90-120 and pH of 7.5 TA is generally only a concern when pH is difficult to balance. If you have a TA of 70 and a pH of 7.5 there is no need to adjust the TA just to meet an arbitrary value. If you do raise the TA to 90, then your pH is also going to rise. If you lower the pH the TA will also drop. pH can be 7.0 to 7.8 in most pools without causing further issues. There is no need to chase a perfect TA and a perfect pH if your pH is in the acceptable range and fairly stable. TA by itself means nothing.

pH and calcium also have a relationship to watch. Conventional recommendation for calcium is 250-450ppm and in most pools this is not a problem. However if you live in an area with very hard water it may be next to impossible to keep the calcium below 450. In that case it is important to keep your pH low, around 7.0, to prevent calcium scale formation in the pool.

Strictly following conventional recommendations can lead you to a pool full of problems if you don't know how the relationships between chemicals work. Knowing these relationships also guides what types of products to use in the pool. If CYA is high enough you don't want to use dichlor granules or trichlor tablets in your pool to provide chlorine. Both of these products contain CYA and will cause CYA to rise over time. The only way to get rid of excess CYA is to drain water out of the pool. It does not evaporate out with the water. Calcium hypochlorite adds calcium to the water along with chlorine. Like CYA, the only way to get rid of excess calcium is to drain water. Liquid chlorine is the only chlorine source that does not add either CYA or calcium to a manually chlorinated pool.
 

shayy_1988

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
56
Miami
Get an FAS/DPD based test kit. You can get the TF 100 from tftestkits.net or the Taylor K2006, which is available online at multiple retailers. I'll share some information with you on why we don't follow conventional pool industry recommendations.

The problem with conventional recommendations is that they treat each chemical value as a separate entity that has no relationship to any other chemical value. For example, conventional recommendations only look at chemical values in their individual ranges, such as FC (chlorine) must be between 1-3ppm, without taking into account how other chemical values interact with each other. This is why they will say a CYA of 90 and FC of 2 are "perfect", because they both fall within the acceptable range for each value. However, CYA and Chlorine must be maintained in a proper ratio to each other. If you look at the FC/CYA Chart you will see that if CYA is 90 in a manually chlorinated pool, FC of 2 is far too low and algae will form under those conditions.

TA and pH are another example. Conventional standards want a TA of 90-120 and pH of 7.5 TA is generally only a concern when pH is difficult to balance. If you have a TA of 70 and a pH of 7.5 there is no need to adjust the TA just to meet an arbitrary value. If you do raise the TA to 90, then your pH is also going to rise. If you lower the pH the TA will also drop. pH can be 7.0 to 7.8 in most pools without causing further issues. There is no need to chase a perfect TA and a perfect pH if your pH is in the acceptable range and fairly stable. TA by itself means nothing.

pH and calcium also have a relationship to watch. Conventional recommendation for calcium is 250-450ppm and in most pools this is not a problem. However if you live in an area with very hard water it may be next to impossible to keep the calcium below 450. In that case it is important to keep your pH low, around 7.0, to prevent calcium scale formation in the pool.

Strictly following conventional recommendations can lead you to a pool full of problems if you don't know how the relationships between chemicals work. Knowing these relationships also guides what types of products to use in the pool. If CYA is high enough you don't want to use dichlor granules or trichlor tablets in your pool to provide chlorine. Both of these products contain CYA and will cause CYA to rise over time. The only way to get rid of excess CYA is to drain water out of the pool. It does not evaporate out with the water. Calcium hypochlorite adds calcium to the water along with chlorine. Like CYA, the only way to get rid of excess calcium is to drain water. Liquid chlorine is the only chlorine source that does not add either CYA or calcium to a manually chlorinated pool.
Ahhh makes sense. I guess as a new pool owner, I felt a sense of comfort because they told us exactly how much of each product to use after testing with them. I guess it will be better to learn now on this small pool so I am more prepared when the inground pool is built. I will be ordering a test kit today and go from there.
 

shayy_1988

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
56
Miami
Ahhh makes sense. I guess as a new pool owner, I felt a sense of comfort because they told us exactly how much of each product to use after testing with them. I guess it will be better to learn now on this small pool so I am more prepared when the inground pool is built. I will be ordering a test kit today and go from there.
I just ordered the kit. Is there a certain order I should do the tests in?
 
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mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
43,966
Laughlin, NV
My routine is -- mix the pool water and CYA reagent (R0013) in the mixing bottle. Set aside
Do the FC test (R0870 and R0871)
pH, then TA, then CH, then back to CYA outside, back to the sun, etc.
That is a full test suite. Once a month I do that, give or take.

The FC and pH you should do daily, or more often, depending on your situation.
TA and CH weekly.
Some videos if you would like to review
 
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duckcmmndr

Bronze Supporter
May 7, 2014
345
Arkansas
Ahhh makes sense. I guess as a new pool owner, I felt a sense of comfort because they told us exactly how much of each product to use after testing with them. I guess it will be better to learn now on this small pool so I am more prepared when the inground pool is built. I will be ordering a test kit today and go from there.
This right here. I had an Intex above ground pool for 5 or 6 years before I put one in the ground. I had heard how much trouble a pool was so I decided I was going to put up an above ground pool to see how hard it was to keep and how much the family would use it. This is your time to learn the TFP method, it's as good as it gets.
 

shayy_1988

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
56
Miami
Thanks!! Yeah, always wanted a pool and now that I'm less than two months in and already having issues I felt defeated. After work today my plan was to drain and refill and start over with the new pump I purchased. I am hopeful this forum will really help me out. I think my biggest issue next is going to be what to add and how much lol.
 

shayy_1988

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
56
Miami
My routine is -- mix the pool water and CYA reagent (R0013) in the mixing bottle. Set aside
Do the FC test (R0870 and R0871)
pH, then TA, then CH, then back to CYA outside, back to the sun, etc.
That is a full test suite. Once a month I do that, give or take.

The FC and pH you should do daily, or more often, depending on your situation.
TA and CH weekly.
Some videos if you would like to review
Thank you so much. I will try this as soon as the kit arrives later this week.
 

shayy_1988

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
56
Miami
Testing guides that. That is why accurate, reliable test results are needed. You only put in the pool what testing tells you is needed.
Thanks, I will look into the pool math also. Question, could the issue just be dead algae continuously settling at the bottom without a real chance of it all filtering out? I have a hard time believing anything left in the pool is live after how much shock/liquid chlorine I have added between Thursday and today. Should I still SLAM?
 

shayy_1988

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
56
Miami
Just got home from work. Here is an updated photo. I let the filter run all day. I said if I saw no change today I would drain. I’m so confused on what to do!!!!! 🥺
 

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IceShadow

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 8, 2019
2,612
Milwaukee, WI
Do what others have advised - order a good test kit like a TFT-100 or a Taylor K-2006c, and add about 5ppm of FC daily with liquid chlorine to hopefully prevent things from getting worse while you wait for the kit to come in.

We can’t help without proper data to help with. The kit is something you need for us to help.
 

Schnozz

Bronze Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 6, 2015
397
Charter Oak, California
So, now it's time to take a deep breath and wait for your test kit to arrive.. As IceShadow, and others have said, there's no need to drain the pool unless your CYA is sky high. The test kit will confirm this for you. Most everything else can be worked out after you start taking your own chemistry readings with your new test kit. For now, as others have said, add 5ppm liquid chlorine once a day and maybe keep your pump running to remove solids. These guys have been, and still are, a great help to me. My first pool went up when I was 59, five years later and I'm still learning, but going strong. The experience you gain with your Intex will be a nice primer for your new inground pool. Welcome to the site and enjoy yourself...
 

shayy_1988

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
56
Miami
Do what others have advised - order a good test kit like a TFT-100 or a Taylor K-2006c, and add about 5ppm of FC daily with liquid chlorine to hopefully prevent things from getting worse while you wait for the kit to come in.

We can’t help without proper data to help with. The kit is something you need for us to help.
Yep, I ordered it. Should arrive Thursday. How much liquid chlorine should be enough to add 5ppm a day?
 

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