Scientific evidence that hi FC is safe

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AJB1234

Gold Supporter
Dec 5, 2015
125
Newport Beach, CA
Hi!

My wife is a microbiologist and is concerned about 2-3ppm of FC in the pool I've noticed that I need FC closer to 5-6 to prevent algae. TFP says FC up to (pool specific) slam levels are safe for swimming if the water is still clear. Do you have any science to back this that I might share with the wife?

Thanks, AJ
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
9,662
Northern NJ
Didn’t we go through this last year with the discussion about CYA levels? FC and CYA levels are interrelated in that higher CYA levels allow most of the higher FC to be buffered. The amount of active chlorine is small.

 

AJB1234

Gold Supporter
Dec 5, 2015
125
Newport Beach, CA
Yes! And TFP successfully got her to accept a higher cya level as a result. Now I'm realizing how much chlorine my pool requires to be algae free and its much more than expected. thanks for helping out!
 

AJB1234

Gold Supporter
Dec 5, 2015
125
Newport Beach, CA
Yes... I am not that happy with the ozone and uv but maybe I would need even more fc without it... not sure. We know ozone technology works but it seems not powerful enough to reduce the fc to levels we were hoping for

Good to know about 4ppm for drinking water.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
9,662
Northern NJ
Just curious... why do so many people and manufacturers recommend 1-3 ppm of chlorine?
Those are government standards from the 1970s that have never been updated with more modern science. No one has a reason to invest in the update. Manufacturers just copy the same guidelines they have used for decades into manuals.
 

Wobblerlorri

Bronze Supporter
Isn't it the UV rays from the Sun that consume CL in our pools?
UV rays, oils, skin flakes, algae, fungus, and all the cooties on the human body eat up FC. Ran an accidental experiment last night -- I had raised my FC to 24 for mustard algae, and my son got in it before I could warn him. He didn't explode, and I lost 4 ppm from him getting in the pool. We had tested at 8 pm, he got in at 9, and I tested again at 10 pm. Nighttime, no UV. One human body ate up 4 ppm FC!
 

Wobblerlorri

Bronze Supporter
Post #7 on this thread convinced me.


That said, I wouldn't make a practice of swimming at 24 ppm FC like my son did, but the normal ranges on the FC/CYA Chart are certainly safe.
 
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