Sch 40 DWV 280PSI PVC Question

Earthman Bob

Bronze Supporter
Mar 25, 2019
56
Long Island
I just started rebuilding my pool plumbing. It had to be done as I had to raise the grade of the area where the plumbing was sitting, to raise the grade of the land.

As you can see in the pictures, I've already cut a hole in the ground so I could access all my pool lines. I cut all of them, added a coupling to each and attached a new pipe going straight up in the air with a cap. We're now ready to remove the filter (that we already emptied), heater and all, raise the grade, then cut all lines to the needed height, add new valves, etc.

However, I just noticed what could be my first big mistake. The PVC I've been using is Sch 40 DWV 280PSI. I've been reading around this site and others, that one should not use Sch 40 DWV, as it's not made for the high pressure of pool plumbing. However, this PVC is supposed to be for 280PSI, which is higher than the PSI of the non-DWB pipe that's being recommended.

I'm hoping someone can make my day and tell me that there's no downside to leaving the work I've already done. If not, it's back to the mud pit!

Thanks for your help on this...
 

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Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
13,995
Bedford, TX
Bob,

The real problem is not the pressure in the pipe, but that the adapters have a very shallow sockets for gluing.. If you look a regular adapter you will see that the pipe goes in almost twice as far and gives you more gluing surface.. This is the reason for not using DWV fittings..

That said, my personal opinion is that as long as you did a good job of cutting the ends square and followed the proper steps in gluing, that you will never have a problem.

So, if I was in your shoes, I would use what I had as long as it is going to be covered by something removable, like dirt.. If it is going to be under all brand new deck, I would be back in the mud pit... :mrgreen:

Thanks,

Jim R.
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
8,880
Northern NJ
One should not use DWV fittings. Need to use schedule 40 fittings that have deeper hubs (ends).

I see a 90 degree sweep on the ground on the left that is DWV. I don’t see any DWV fittings installed on your new work visible in the pics.

Schedule 40 pipe also marked DWV is fine to use on pools.
 
Last edited:

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
16,073
If the pipe has ASTM D 1785 on the pipe, it's suitable for pressure applications. A rating of ASTM D 2665 means non pressure applications.

A pipe can be dual rated ASTM D 1785 and ASTM D 2665, but it has to say ASTM D 1785 if it's going to be used for pressure.

The pipe should also be labeled NSF-PW (National Sanitation Foundation - Potable Water) and Schedule 40 PVC.

The fittings look like schedule 40.
 

Bama Rambler

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 22, 2009
23,535
SouthWest Alabama
The piping in your pictures is dual rated and NSF-PW certified, so it's fine to use. Those fittings are also schedule 40, so they're fine also.
 

Earthman Bob

Bronze Supporter
Mar 25, 2019
56
Long Island
Bob,

The real problem is not the pressure in the pipe, but that the adapters have a very shallow sockets for gluing.. If you look a regular adapter you will see that the pipe goes in almost twice as far and gives you more gluing surface.. This is the reason for not using DWV fittings..

That said, my personal opinion is that as long as you did a good job of cutting the ends square and followed the proper steps in gluing, that you will never have a problem.

So, if I was in your shoes, I would use what I had as long as it is going to be covered by something removable, like dirt.. If it is going to be under all brand new deck, I would be back in the mud pit... :mrgreen:

Thanks,

Jim R.
You've made my night!

As you can see in the pictures, I'm only using deep couplings that do have a very deep gluing surface. I'm also doing a pretty precise job of gluing by cutting old pipes straight cleaning up/sanding the old pipe, beveling inside edges, priming and gluing every surface (with no missed spots!), twisting as I insert the pieces and holding for 30 seconds.

And it will be under dirt.
 

Earthman Bob

Bronze Supporter
Mar 25, 2019
56
Long Island
So here's another question. I've been using Oatey's regular, clear PVC cement for all my pipes, couplings, elbows. The guy at Home Depot said that was OK to use on all pvc, including pool valves. (He's a licensed plumber.)

However, after reading up on this, that's not what I'm going to do. Oatey's makes another general-purpose PVC glue that is made for all PVC including CPVC. My plan is to use that any time my pipes connect to valves.

Is that the correct way to go?
 

Earthman Bob

Bronze Supporter
Mar 25, 2019
56
Long Island
If the pipe has ASTM D 1785 on the pipe, it's suitable for pressure applications. A rating of ASTM D 2665 means non pressure applications.

A pipe can be dual rated ASTM D 1785 and ASTM D 2665, but it has to say ASTM D 1785 if it's going to be used for pressure.

The pipe should also be labeled NSF-PW (National Sanitation Foundation - Potable Water) and Schedule 40 PVC.

The fittings look like schedule 40.
Yes on all the above. Phew!

Thanks so much--
 

ajw22

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jul 21, 2013
8,880
Northern NJ
So here's another question. I've been using Oatey's regular, clear PVC cement for all my pipes, couplings, elbows. The guy at Home Depot said that was OK to use on all pvc, including pool valves. (He's a licensed plumber.)

However, after reading up on this, that's not what I'm going to do. Oatey's makes another general-purpose PVC glue that is made for all PVC including CPVC. My plan is to use that any time my pipes connect to valves.

Is that the correct way to go?
Regular clear glue will work if you give it 12 hours to set.

Or you can use Oaty red to join PVC to CPVC for pool uses.
 

Earthman Bob

Bronze Supporter
Mar 25, 2019
56
Long Island
Interesting. The regular clear glue's consistency and applicator are far better than the those of the small red general purpose glue. So I'd prefer to do what you said... using the regular clear and waiting the 12 hours.

Thanks!
 

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
13,995
Bedford, TX
Bob,

After doing all that work, I really hope you are not planning on using any of those ball valves????? We only recommend Jandy Neverlube valves...

Thanks,

Jim R.
 

Bama Rambler

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
LifeTime Supporter
Jun 22, 2009
23,535
SouthWest Alabama
So here's another question. I've been using Oatey's regular, clear PVC cement for all my pipes, couplings, elbows. The guy at Home Depot said that was OK to use on all pvc, including pool valves. (He's a licensed plumber.)

However, after reading up on this, that's not what I'm going to do. Oatey's makes another general-purpose PVC glue that is made for all PVC including CPVC. My plan is to use that any time my pipes connect to valves.

Is that the correct way to go?
While the regular PVC glue is fine for cold water, I use the All-Purpose that is good for PVC, CPVC & ABS, or the All-Purpose that is good for CPVC & PVC. The reason I keep that is so that I don't have to worry about whether I'm working on PVC or CPVC. Also the RV has ABS drain lines, so the ABS glue works on those.