Safety cover install - 3/4" diamond bit

TritonPoolMGMT

In The Industry
Sep 15, 2015
6
Brantford
Hello,

I installed a pool this fall. Looking to install the safety cover. I currently have a 3/4" carbide bit and Bosch rotary hammer. Have installed covers in past with carbide with good results but was looking to get better result with a diamond bit. Problem is I can't find one. Anyone installed cover anchors with a diamond bit and where did you get it?
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
4,131
Damascus, MD
If you are going into regular concrete I would suggest a hammer drill and masonry bit. Depending how many holes perhaps get 2 or 3 bits.
 

JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
17,445
There are no diamond hammerdrill bits.

The diamond bits are core drill hole saws.

Core drilling is appropriate for certain types of decks where a hammerdrill would cause chips, cracks or other damage.

Tile, stone etc will usually be better off with a core drill.

Diamond core drilling is significantly more expensive and time consuming than a regular hammerdrill.

If a customer has a deck where core drilling is appropriate, advise them of the additional costs.

Installing a cover using a core drill can be twice as expensive as a regular install.
 

1Sammy

In The Industry
Jul 20, 2017
220
Windsor, Ontario. Canada
That carbide bit should not be a problem. Is the drill a huge two handed one with real power and not a one handed with a added handle. 3/4" in 4" of concrete and i pop through very fast. Seconds just to get to the depth for the cover inserts.
 

Rich D

Bronze Supporter
Aug 3, 2018
585
MA
Check your local industrial rental shop. I have rented some very nice hand held coring machines for a very reasonable rate. I would think if we're any type of paver then a nice 3/4 core would be the way to go..
 

PoolGate

Gold Supporter
TFP Guide
Jun 7, 2017
4,131
Damascus, MD
I think a core drill is a bit overkill for the holes needed for cover anchors. With a standard hammer drill and a new bit it's like 30 seconds a hole.
 
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JamesW

TFP Expert
Mar 2, 2011
17,445
A hammerdrill can damage certain surfaces.

For most surfaces, a hammerdrill is fine.

However, there are times when a coredrill is a good choice.
 
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