Running equipment 24/7 for two weeks?

OGSW20

Well-known member
Jun 11, 2019
120
San Jose, CA
My PB just got my equipment running on my new build. He told me that I need to run the pumps for two weeks straight 24/7 to clear out the new plaster particles while the plaster cures. Is that correct? Is it really necessary?

Just caught me off guard with this one and wanted to check in with you guys on what your thoughts are to run the pumps 24/7 for two weeks.
 

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Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
19,496
Bedford, TX
20,

It is not going to hurt anything... I have three saltwater pools that have been running 24/7 for a total of about 19 years without any problems at all.

Of course, now that I have said that, they will all bite the dust tomorrow... :mrgreen:

Thanks,

Jim R.
 
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NorCalX

Gold Supporter
Feb 3, 2011
305
Brentwood, CA
I was actually discussing this with my PB yesterday as we transition out of start up and to regular maintenance.

I'm totally fine running it 24/7. Basically like leaving a light bulb on.

Just need to figure out SWG and solar operation windows.
 

jimim

Bronze Supporter
Jun 20, 2016
2,939
NE/Pa
I run a very low speed 24/7 with some increases in rpm at various times to skim. It has really worked well over the past 3 seasons.

I got that from a member here and it really is working out well for me.
 

OGSW20

Well-known member
Jun 11, 2019
120
San Jose, CA
Hmmm... never realized that many people run their pumps 24/7 ongoing. That doesn't diminish the life of the pump? Or, are these pumps built so well that they are considered a "commercial" pump and made to last this kind of runtime?

For example, a pressure washer you would buy for home use is not used very often and it can last for years. However, if used everyday, will be lucky if it last for one year. I know first hand because I have to buy a new pressure washer every year for a detail company. A commercial pressure washer will be 10x the cost of a "residential" pressure washer and will last much longer than one year.
 

Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
19,496
Bedford, TX
Most people that run their pumps 24/7 are using VS pumps like your 2.7 VSS epump or similar pumps. One theory is that when it come to wear and tear on a pump, turning it on and off on a daily basis degrades the pump just a much, or more, than running 24/7.. Most people that run 24/7 are also running at some low speed like 1200 to 1500 RPMs.

Pool pumps by Hayward, Jandy and Pentair often last 20 years...

Thanks,

Jim R.
 
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mas985

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 3, 2007
13,779
Pleasanton, CA
In most pumps, the first things to fail are the seals and/or bearings and the lifetime for those are going to be based primarily upon run time (cumulative hours). The start and stop of a VS pump, at least the more sophisticated varieties, have slow ramping speeds for start up and slow down to diminish the excess shaft loads so those activities really shouldn't affect the pump lifetime all that much.. So from perspective, I would think the longer run times will shorten the life of the pump (seals & bearings) more so than the start ups and shut downs. Plus the excess cost of the electricity which over time can add up even on lower speeds.
 
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Jimrahbe

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
Jul 7, 2014
19,496
Bedford, TX
Mark,

What you say makes perfect sense, but my plan is to test your theory... :mrgreen:

I have stated many times that I have three IntelliFlo pumps that run 24/7, mostly at 1200 RPM.. I do it for a number of reasons, but one of them is now to see how long they will last.

This website will be the first to know when, or if, one of them fails... It will be interesting to see what goes first, the electronics, the bearings or the seals, (or me... :) ).. So far no bearing noise, no seal leaks.. One is about 8 years old, one is about 7 years old and the other about 4 or 5 years old.

It will be interesting to see what fails first... When it does, I might need your expertise in helping me decide if I should repair the pump and continue my tests, or if it just makes sense to buy a new one.

Do you have a feel for the average life span of an IntelliFlo pump?

Thanks for the input,

Jim R.
 
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mas985

TFP Expert
LifeTime Supporter
May 3, 2007
13,779
Pleasanton, CA
Do you have a feel for the average life span of an IntelliFlo pump?
Much like any pump, VS or not, if regularly inspected for leaks and properly cared for, there is no reason it should not last 20+ years. The reality is that most people do not notice the leaks before they start causing problems for the bearings and/or excess corrosion. For single/dual speed pumps, the excess load caused by failing bearings can then lead to winding/capacitor failure and/or periodic thermal shut down. For VS pumps, the drive will usually shut down on it's own. However, you can avoid a lot of these issues by simply looking for small leaks and keeping the pump dry. As you know, proper surge protection is another big factor for VS pump drive reliability.

Generally speaking, both mechanical and electrical failures can often be attributed to anomalies that force the device to operate outside of design specifications. Keep these to a minimum and it should last a good long time. However, that is easier said than done.
 

Chickinvic

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2017
266
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Hmmm... never realized that many people run their pumps 24/7 ongoing. That doesn't diminish the life of the pump? Or, are these pumps built so well that they are considered a "commercial" pump and made to last this kind of runtime?

For example, a pressure washer you would buy for home use is not used very often and it can last for years. However, if used everyday, will be lucky if it last for one year. I know first hand because I have to buy a new pressure washer every year for a detail company. A commercial pressure washer will be 10x the cost of a "residential" pressure washer and will last much longer than one year.
I have no idea how old my pump is, but we run it 24/7 for the 5.5 months of the year the pool is open. It is not a variable speed either. I don't see that much of an increase in our power bill and to us it is worth it. Whenever it does Crud out we'll get a variable speed, but for now it is going strong.
 
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Bam Bam

Gold Supporter
Sep 14, 2019
69
Columbia, SC
My almost 20 yo pump runs 24/7 from day pool opens to closes for the season. With all the power dips, etc. running on a timer gets wacky unless of course timers are no longer affected by such mundane things. I like to see the water rippling on its way. If it’s not I panic...algae bloom, geese landing, etc.

Off topic, The plumber installed a timer on my instantaneous water heater to circulate water during peak usage times. With a few power failures peak usage started at 3 AM! The contraption wasn’t worth going under the house to reset each time (bigger bugs, dark, snakes!).
 
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OGSW20

Well-known member
Jun 11, 2019
120
San Jose, CA
Got my first electric bill today after starting up my pool and running my pumps 24/7 for 2-3 weeks. I ran the VS pump on low most of the time, but my water feature pump is a single speed and that ran continuously for a good 2 weeks. My bill was triple!!! Yikes!!!

I really need to fine tune my run times on what is necessary.
 

OGSW20

Well-known member
Jun 11, 2019
120
San Jose, CA
20,

Most of that is because of the single speed pump.. VS on a low RPM cost next to nothing to run..

Jim R.
That's what I'm guessing as well. Now that my water is all balanced, SWG is running, and pool cover being installed today, I will no longer have to run the pumps to circulate the water. The single speed is only on for 30 min a day and will probably turn that off completely and only turn it on when we want it on. I will play around with the VS to see how much chlorine is generated vs what we need. I'm sure I will be able to cut that bill in half, hopefully. Part of the reason it was triple was because I got hit with an excessive use surcharge.
 

Chickinvic

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2017
266
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20,

Most of that is because of the single speed pump.. VS on a low RPM cost next to nothing to run..

Jim R.
Tripled bill is a lot. I run a single speed pump 24/7 the entire pool season and it doesn't seem to increase our bill that much. I thought Ontario had high electricity rates, but maybe not so much in comparison. I think the bulk of most of my electricity bills is in mysterious "delivery" charges and such. The actual increased power usage doesn't seem to make as much difference.
 
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mknauss

Mod Squad
TFP Expert
Bronze Supporter
May 3, 2014
33,382
Laughlin, NV
A 1 hp (if that is the THP) motor will consume right at 1kwH. So that is about 720kwH per month. You must use a lot of electricity each month in the summer if that much electricity use has little effect on your bill.
 

Chickinvic

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2017
266
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
A 1 hp (if that is the THP) motor will consume right at 1kwH. So that is about 720kwH per month. You must use a lot of electricity each month in the summer if that much electricity use has little effect on your bill.
Actually when I looked closely at a couple bills, my summer monthly average cost for the electricity is about $155 which is considerably higher than the winter months, so when I truly look at the cost it is about double. For some reason I didn't think it was much more lol.